Public & Urban Affairs (Minor) 2018-06-13T08:38:05+00:00

     P.U.A.

         PUBLIC AND URBAN AFFAIRS (MINOR)

     P.U.A

        PUBLIC AND URBAN AFFAIRS (MINOR)

Undergraduate Minors

The School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) offers a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in public and urban affairs, as well as majors and minors.

Two undergraduate majors are available:
Major in Smart and Sustainable Cities (SSC)
Major in Environmental Policy and Planning (EPP)

Four undergraduate minors are available:
Minor in Public and Urban Affairs (PUA)
Minor in Environmental Policy and Planning (EPP)
Minor in Real Estate (RE)
Minor in Watershed Management (WM)

Degree Requirements

The graduation requirements in effect at the time of graduation apply. When choosing the degree requirements information, always choose the year of your expected date of graduation. Requirements for graduation are referred to via university publications as “Checksheets”. The number of credit hours required for degree completion varies among curricula. Students must satisfactorily complete all requirements and university obligations for degree completion.

The university reserves the right to modify requirements in a degree program. However, the university will not alter degree requirements less than two years from the expected graduation year unless there is a transition plan for students already in the degree program.

Please visit the University Registrar website at http://registrar.vt.edu/graduation-multi-brief/index1.html for degree requirements.

Satisfactory Progress

University policy requires that students who are making satisfactory progress toward a degree meet minimum criteria toward the General Education (Curriculum for Liberal Education) (see “Academics“) and toward the degree in Urban Affairs and Planning.

Satisfactory progress requirements toward the B.A. in Public and Urban Affairs and B.S. in Environmental Policy and Planning can be found on the major checksheet by visiting the University Registrar website at http://registrar.vt.edu/graduation-multi-brief/index1.html.

Undergraduate Minor in Public and Urban Affairs (PUA)
A minor in Public and Urban Affairs requires completion of 18 credit hours. Please visit the checksheets website to find an approved list of courses for your year of graduation.

PUA MINOR, CURRENT CHECKLIST FOR GRADUATION*
*View the current checklist on the university site to confirm

Minor GPA minimum 2.0. Minor GPA calculated from UAP 1024, 3014, and 12 additional UAP hours, from the elective courses below.
REQUIRED COURSES:
This class introduces some of the most vital concerns and issues challenging democratic capitalistic urban societies today. Topics addressed include different perspectives on the causes and portent of the urban underclass, the growing inequality between the educated and less well educated in the nation’s labor markets, the causes of the marked resegregation of many of the nation’s urban centers by race and income and the implications of privatization and interjurisdictional competition for the public policy behavior and outcomes of subnational governments. (3H,3C)
An introduction to urban policy and urban planning. Includes analysis of the basic concepts and principles of urban policy, a review of urban policy in the United States, discussion of the development of urban planning and its role in shaping the urban environment, and an analysis of the relationship between public policy and planning and the organization and structure of the urban environment. Must complete prerequisite UAP 1024 with a B- grade or higher. Pre: 1024. (3H,3C)
ELECTIVES (only one may be 2000-level):
Relationships between urbanization and economic development; role of cities in social, political, cultural, and economic development of societies; cities as settings for innovation and change. (3H,3C)
Introduction to research in political science; formulation of theory, operationalization and measurement, gathering, analysis and interpretation of data. Pre: 1014 or 1014H, 1024 or 1024H. (3H,3C)
Overview and application of various methods used to study, represent, understand communities in their urban and regional context. Data collection and analysis; population, land use, transportation and economic forecasting; selecting and applying an appropriate method; designing and presenting a community study. Restricted to majors and minors only. (3H,3C)
Critical examination of major global environmental problems (e.g., global warming, atmospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, tropical deforestation, toxic waste) with emphasis on their social, economic, political, ethical, and policy implications and solutions. Completion of Area 4 of University Core required. (3H,3C)
Critical examination of major global environmental problems (e.g., global warming, atmospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, tropical deforestation, toxic waste) with emphasis on their social, economic, political, ethical, and policy implications and solutions. Completion of Area 4 of University Core required. (3H,3C)
Introduction to the interdisciplinary principles of environmental policy, planning, economics, and ethics to address pollution abatement, resources conservation, habitat protection, and environmental restoration. The course will focus on practical means of identifying environmental problems and creatively solving them. (3H,3C)
The role and context of public administration in the contemporary United States, administrative organization and decision-making, public finance, human resources administration, and program implementation. Pre: 1014 or 1014H. (3H,3C)
UAP 3416: Public Budgeting

UAP 3604: Public Financial Management

Description and analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the making and implementation of public policy in the United States, with a primary focus on domestic and economic policy. Empirical and normative models of the process of public policy making in the U.S. Pre: PSCI 1014. (3H,3C)
Description and analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the making and implementation of public policy in the United States, with a primary focus on domestic and economic policy. Empirical and normative models of the process of public policy making in the U.S. Pre: PSCI 1014. (3H,3C)
Methods and approaches used in the analysis and evaluation of public policy; strengths and limitations of various analytic tools; normative issues in the practice of policy analysis. Pre: PSCI 1014 or PSCI 1014H. (3H,3C)
Issues, concepts, and techniques of citizen participation in community development. Institutional frameworks and their historical precedents. Exercises developing group communications skills, public meeting facilitation, and design of community involvement programs. Pre: Senior standing required. (3H,3C)
UAP 4224: Policy-making in the Federal System

UAP 4244: Non-profit Organization and Management

Issues in applied environmental ethics. Contributions of diverse religious and philosophical traditions to contemporary perspectives on the human-nature relationship. Examination of environmental policies from utilitarian economic, deep ecology, and ecofeminist perspectives. Junior, senior or graduate standing required. (3H,3C)
This course examines the legal principles and policy debates involved in the regulation and protection of critical environmental resources. Specific topics vary but will likely include wetlands law and policy, endangered species habitat, open space, forestland and farmland protection, coastal zone management, and floodplain regulation and policy. (3H,3C)
Environmental factors involved in land use planning and development, including topography, soils, geologic hazards, flooding and stormwater management, ecological features, and visual quality. Techniques used in conducting environmental land inventories and land suitability analyses. Policies and programs to protect environmental quality in land use planning and development. Pre: Junior standing. (3H,3C)
Planning and policy aspects of managing residuals and environmental contaminants and their effects on human health and environmental quality. Technical and economic factors involved in management of water quality, air quality, solid and hazardous wastes, toxic substances, and noise. Implementation of pollution control legislation, policies, and programs at federal, state, and local levels. (3H,3C)
Practical design fundamentals for small scale renewable energy systems: solar building heating and cooling; solar domestic hot water; wind, photovoltaic, and hydroelectric systems; alcohol, methane and other biomass conversion systems. Developing plans, programs, and policies to stimulate development of renewable systems. Pre: (MATH 1016 or MATH 1025). (3H,3C)
UAP 4604: Social Policy and Planning

This seminar is the integrative forum for the principal elements of the Washington Semester experience. The course explores both the role of political institutions in policy formation and implementation and the primary managerial and leadership challenges that arise for implementing organization managers in American democratic public policy-making. Pre: Junior standing or instructor consent and acceptance into the Washington Semester program. X-grade allowed. (3H,3C)
This course is part of the Washington Semester. Explores the relationship between the imperatives of democratic mobilization, policy choices and organizational choices through intensive study of the operating context of a selected public or nonprofit organization. Examines implications of policy-maker choices for implementing institution dynamics and challenges. Pre: Junior standing and acceptance into the Washington Semester program required. X-grade allowed. Pre: PSCI 3714. (3H,3C)
Examines the provision and financing of public goods and services in local governments. Analyzes associated policy issues. Reviews experience in Western Europe and developing countries, as well as in the United States. Must complete prerequisites UAP 3024 with B- grade or higher, and ECON 2005 and 2006 with C grade or higher. Pre: 3024, (ECON 2005 or ECON 2005H), (ECON 2006 or ECON 2006H). (3H,3C)
Introduction to real estate, including markets, land use planning and zoning, development, finance, construction, sales, marketing, management and property valuation. Examines the key actors and processes in each of these areas. Explores major public policies impacting real estate.
Examination of the legal context in which urban planning and public policy operate. Legal structure, role of law, powers of sovereign governments, constitutional limitations on government activities, and public-private conflict and their influence on planning and public policy are examined. Pre: Junior standing required. (3H,3C)
Examination of major development theories and contemporary issues and characteristics of low-income societies (industrialization, urbanization, migration, rural poverty, hunger, foreign trade, and debt) that establish contexts for development planning and policy-making. Junior standing required. (3H,3C)
Course examines the interdependences among the elements of the built environment of the city and those between the elements of the built environment and the policy/planning structure of the city. Considered are those elements associated with the primary urban activities (residential, commercial, industrial) as well as the urban form-giving infrastructure facilities that support those land uses (water supply, sewerage, solid waste disposal, transportation, education, recreation, health, and safety). Pre: UAP 3224. (3H,3C)
UAP Faculty
SPIA Contacts

Ralph Hall, Undergraduate Program Director
201 Architecture Annex
540-231-7332 | rphall@vt.edu

Chris LaPlante, Undergraduate Advisor
209 Architecture Annex
(540) 231-3831 | chrisl@vt.edu

Myriam Lechuga, Graduate Student Coordinator
(703) 706-8111 | mlechuga@vt.edu

SPIA Locations

Washington D.C.
1021 Prince Street | Alexandria, VA 22314

Contact SPIA

Security Code:
security code
Please enter the security code:

Submit
REQUEST INFORMATION
Undergraduate Minors

The School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) offers a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in public and urban affairs, as well as majors and minors.

Two undergraduate majors are available:
Major in Smart and Sustainable Cities (SSC)
Major in Environmental Policy and Planning (EPP)

Four undergraduate minors are available:
Minor in Public and Urban Affairs (PUA)
Minor in Environmental Policy and Planning (EPP)
Minor in Real Estate (RE)
Minor in Watershed Management (WM)

Degree Requirements

The graduation requirements in effect at the time of graduation apply. When choosing the degree requirements information, always choose the year of your expected date of graduation. Requirements for graduation are referred to via university publications as “Checksheets”. The number of credit hours required for degree completion varies among curricula. Students must satisfactorily complete all requirements and university obligations for degree completion.

The university reserves the right to modify requirements in a degree program. However, the university will not alter degree requirements less than two years from the expected graduation year unless there is a transition plan for students already in the degree program.

Please visit the University Registrar website at http://registrar.vt.edu/graduation-multi-brief/index1.html for degree requirements.

Satisfactory Progress

University policy requires that students who are making satisfactory progress toward a degree meet minimum criteria toward the General Education (Curriculum for Liberal Education) (see “Academics“) and toward the degree in Urban Affairs and Planning.

Satisfactory progress requirements toward the B.A. in Public and Urban Affairs and B.S. in Environmental Policy and Planning can be found on the major checksheet by visiting the University Registrar website at http://registrar.vt.edu/graduation-multi-brief/index1.html.

Undergraduate Minor in Public and Urban Affairs (PUA)
A minor in Public and Urban Affairs requires completion of 18 credit hours. Please visit the checksheets website to find an approved list of courses for your year of graduation.

PUA MINOR, CURRENT CHECKLIST FOR GRADUATION*
*View the current checklist on the university site to confirm

Minor GPA minimum 2.0. Minor GPA calculated from UAP 1024, 3014, and 12 additional UAP hours, from the elective courses below.
REQUIRED COURSES:
This class introduces some of the most vital concerns and issues challenging democratic capitalistic urban societies today. Topics addressed include different perspectives on the causes and portent of the urban underclass, the growing inequality between the educated and less well educated in the nation’s labor markets, the causes of the marked resegregation of many of the nation’s urban centers by race and income and the implications of privatization and interjurisdictional competition for the public policy behavior and outcomes of subnational governments. (3H,3C)
An introduction to urban policy and urban planning. Includes analysis of the basic concepts and principles of urban policy, a review of urban policy in the United States, discussion of the development of urban planning and its role in shaping the urban environment, and an analysis of the relationship between public policy and planning and the organization and structure of the urban environment. Must complete prerequisite UAP 1024 with a B- grade or higher. Pre: 1024. (3H,3C)
ELECTIVES (only one may be 2000-level):
Relationships between urbanization and economic development; role of cities in social, political, cultural, and economic development of societies; cities as settings for innovation and change. (3H,3C)
Introduction to research in political science; formulation of theory, operationalization and measurement, gathering, analysis and interpretation of data. Pre: 1014 or 1014H, 1024 or 1024H. (3H,3C)
Overview and application of various methods used to study, represent, understand communities in their urban and regional context. Data collection and analysis; population, land use, transportation and economic forecasting; selecting and applying an appropriate method; designing and presenting a community study. Restricted to majors and minors only. (3H,3C)
Critical examination of major global environmental problems (e.g., global warming, atmospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, tropical deforestation, toxic waste) with emphasis on their social, economic, political, ethical, and policy implications and solutions. Completion of Area 4 of University Core required. (3H,3C)
Critical examination of major global environmental problems (e.g., global warming, atmospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, tropical deforestation, toxic waste) with emphasis on their social, economic, political, ethical, and policy implications and solutions. Completion of Area 4 of University Core required. (3H,3C)
Introduction to the interdisciplinary principles of environmental policy, planning, economics, and ethics to address pollution abatement, resources conservation, habitat protection, and environmental restoration. The course will focus on practical means of identifying environmental problems and creatively solving them. (3H,3C)
The role and context of public administration in the contemporary United States, administrative organization and decision-making, public finance, human resources administration, and program implementation. Pre: 1014 or 1014H. (3H,3C)
UAP 3416: Public Budgeting

UAP 3604: Public Financial Management

Description and analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the making and implementation of public policy in the United States, with a primary focus on domestic and economic policy. Empirical and normative models of the process of public policy making in the U.S. Pre: PSCI 1014. (3H,3C)
Description and analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the making and implementation of public policy in the United States, with a primary focus on domestic and economic policy. Empirical and normative models of the process of public policy making in the U.S. Pre: PSCI 1014. (3H,3C)
Methods and approaches used in the analysis and evaluation of public policy; strengths and limitations of various analytic tools; normative issues in the practice of policy analysis. Pre: PSCI 1014 or PSCI 1014H. (3H,3C)
Issues, concepts, and techniques of citizen participation in community development. Institutional frameworks and their historical precedents. Exercises developing group communications skills, public meeting facilitation, and design of community involvement programs. Pre: Senior standing required. (3H,3C)
UAP 4224: Policy-making in the Federal System

UAP 4244: Non-profit Organization and Management

Issues in applied environmental ethics. Contributions of diverse religious and philosophical traditions to contemporary perspectives on the human-nature relationship. Examination of environmental policies from utilitarian economic, deep ecology, and ecofeminist perspectives. Junior, senior or graduate standing required. (3H,3C)
This course examines the legal principles and policy debates involved in the regulation and protection of critical environmental resources. Specific topics vary but will likely include wetlands law and policy, endangered species habitat, open space, forestland and farmland protection, coastal zone management, and floodplain regulation and policy. (3H,3C)
Environmental factors involved in land use planning and development, including topography, soils, geologic hazards, flooding and stormwater management, ecological features, and visual quality. Techniques used in conducting environmental land inventories and land suitability analyses. Policies and programs to protect environmental quality in land use planning and development. Pre: Junior standing. (3H,3C)
Planning and policy aspects of managing residuals and environmental contaminants and their effects on human health and environmental quality. Technical and economic factors involved in management of water quality, air quality, solid and hazardous wastes, toxic substances, and noise. Implementation of pollution control legislation, policies, and programs at federal, state, and local levels. (3H,3C)
Practical design fundamentals for small scale renewable energy systems: solar building heating and cooling; solar domestic hot water; wind, photovoltaic, and hydroelectric systems; alcohol, methane and other biomass conversion systems. Developing plans, programs, and policies to stimulate development of renewable systems. Pre: (MATH 1016 or MATH 1025). (3H,3C)
UAP 4604: Social Policy and Planning

This seminar is the integrative forum for the principal elements of the Washington Semester experience. The course explores both the role of political institutions in policy formation and implementation and the primary managerial and leadership challenges that arise for implementing organization managers in American democratic public policy-making. Pre: Junior standing or instructor consent and acceptance into the Washington Semester program. X-grade allowed. (3H,3C)
This course is part of the Washington Semester. Explores the relationship between the imperatives of democratic mobilization, policy choices and organizational choices through intensive study of the operating context of a selected public or nonprofit organization. Examines implications of policy-maker choices for implementing institution dynamics and challenges. Pre: Junior standing and acceptance into the Washington Semester program required. X-grade allowed. Pre: PSCI 3714. (3H,3C)
Examines the provision and financing of public goods and services in local governments. Analyzes associated policy issues. Reviews experience in Western Europe and developing countries, as well as in the United States. Must complete prerequisites UAP 3024 with B- grade or higher, and ECON 2005 and 2006 with C grade or higher. Pre: 3024, (ECON 2005 or ECON 2005H), (ECON 2006 or ECON 2006H). (3H,3C)
Introduction to real estate, including markets, land use planning and zoning, development, finance, construction, sales, marketing, management and property valuation. Examines the key actors and processes in each of these areas. Explores major public policies impacting real estate.
Examination of the legal context in which urban planning and public policy operate. Legal structure, role of law, powers of sovereign governments, constitutional limitations on government activities, and public-private conflict and their influence on planning and public policy are examined. Pre: Junior standing required. (3H,3C)
Examination of major development theories and contemporary issues and characteristics of low-income societies (industrialization, urbanization, migration, rural poverty, hunger, foreign trade, and debt) that establish contexts for development planning and policy-making. Junior standing required. (3H,3C)
Course examines the interdependences among the elements of the built environment of the city and those between the elements of the built environment and the policy/planning structure of the city. Considered are those elements associated with the primary urban activities (residential, commercial, industrial) as well as the urban form-giving infrastructure facilities that support those land uses (water supply, sewerage, solid waste disposal, transportation, education, recreation, health, and safety). Pre: UAP 3224. (3H,3C)
UAP Faculty
SPIA Contacts

Ralph Hall, Undergraduate Program Director
201 Architecture Annex
540-231-7332 | rphall@vt.edu

Chris LaPlante, Undergraduate Advisor
209 Architecture Annex
(540) 231-3831 | chrisl@vt.edu

Myriam Lechuga, Graduate Student Coordinator
(703) 706-8111 | mlechuga@vt.edu

SPIA Locations

Washington D.C.
1021 Prince Street | Alexandria, VA 22314

Contact SPIA

Security Code:
security code
Please enter the security code:

Submit
REQUEST INFORMATION
Undergraduate Minors

The School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) offers a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in public and urban affairs, as well as majors and minors.

Two undergraduate majors are available:
Major in Smart and Sustainable Cities (SSC)
Major in Environmental Policy and Planning (EPP)

Four undergraduate minors are available:
Minor in Public and Urban Affairs (PUA)
Minor in Environmental Policy and Planning (EPP)
Minor in Real Estate (RE)
Minor in Watershed Management (WM)

Degree Requirements

The graduation requirements in effect at the time of graduation apply. When choosing the degree requirements information, always choose the year of your expected date of graduation. Requirements for graduation are referred to via university publications as “Checksheets”. The number of credit hours required for degree completion varies among curricula. Students must satisfactorily complete all requirements and university obligations for degree completion.

The university reserves the right to modify requirements in a degree program. However, the university will not alter degree requirements less than two years from the expected graduation year unless there is a transition plan for students already in the degree program.

Please visit the University Registrar website at http://registrar.vt.edu/graduation-multi-brief/index1.html for degree requirements.

Satisfactory Progress

University policy requires that students who are making satisfactory progress toward a degree meet minimum criteria toward the General Education (Curriculum for Liberal Education) (see “Academics“) and toward the degree in Urban Affairs and Planning.

Satisfactory progress requirements toward the B.A. in Public and Urban Affairs and B.S. in Environmental Policy and Planning can be found on the major checksheet by visiting the University Registrar website at http://registrar.vt.edu/graduation-multi-brief/index1.html.

Undergraduate Minor in Public and Urban Affairs (PUA)
A minor in Public and Urban Affairs requires completion of 18 credit hours. Please visit the checksheets website to find an approved list of courses for your year of graduation.

PUA MINOR, CURRENT CHECKLIST FOR GRADUATION*
*View the current checklist on the university site to confirm

Minor GPA minimum 2.0. Minor GPA calculated from UAP 1024, 3014, and 12 additional UAP hours, from the elective courses below.
REQUIRED COURSES:
This class introduces some of the most vital concerns and issues challenging democratic capitalistic urban societies today. Topics addressed include different perspectives on the causes and portent of the urban underclass, the growing inequality between the educated and less well educated in the nation’s labor markets, the causes of the marked resegregation of many of the nation’s urban centers by race and income and the implications of privatization and interjurisdictional competition for the public policy behavior and outcomes of subnational governments. (3H,3C)
An introduction to urban policy and urban planning. Includes analysis of the basic concepts and principles of urban policy, a review of urban policy in the United States, discussion of the development of urban planning and its role in shaping the urban environment, and an analysis of the relationship between public policy and planning and the organization and structure of the urban environment. Must complete prerequisite UAP 1024 with a B- grade or higher. Pre: 1024. (3H,3C)
ELECTIVES (only one may be 2000-level):
Relationships between urbanization and economic development; role of cities in social, political, cultural, and economic development of societies; cities as settings for innovation and change. (3H,3C)
Introduction to research in political science; formulation of theory, operationalization and measurement, gathering, analysis and interpretation of data. Pre: 1014 or 1014H, 1024 or 1024H. (3H,3C)
Overview and application of various methods used to study, represent, understand communities in their urban and regional context. Data collection and analysis; population, land use, transportation and economic forecasting; selecting and applying an appropriate method; designing and presenting a community study. Restricted to majors and minors only. (3H,3C)
Critical examination of major global environmental problems (e.g., global warming, atmospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, tropical deforestation, toxic waste) with emphasis on their social, economic, political, ethical, and policy implications and solutions. Completion of Area 4 of University Core required. (3H,3C)
Critical examination of major global environmental problems (e.g., global warming, atmospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, tropical deforestation, toxic waste) with emphasis on their social, economic, political, ethical, and policy implications and solutions. Completion of Area 4 of University Core required. (3H,3C)
Introduction to the interdisciplinary principles of environmental policy, planning, economics, and ethics to address pollution abatement, resources conservation, habitat protection, and environmental restoration. The course will focus on practical means of identifying environmental problems and creatively solving them. (3H,3C)
The role and context of public administration in the contemporary United States, administrative organization and decision-making, public finance, human resources administration, and program implementation. Pre: 1014 or 1014H. (3H,3C)
UAP 3416: Public Budgeting

UAP 3604: Public Financial Management

Description and analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the making and implementation of public policy in the United States, with a primary focus on domestic and economic policy. Empirical and normative models of the process of public policy making in the U.S. Pre: PSCI 1014. (3H,3C)
Description and analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the making and implementation of public policy in the United States, with a primary focus on domestic and economic policy. Empirical and normative models of the process of public policy making in the U.S. Pre: PSCI 1014. (3H,3C)
Methods and approaches used in the analysis and evaluation of public policy; strengths and limitations of various analytic tools; normative issues in the practice of policy analysis. Pre: PSCI 1014 or PSCI 1014H. (3H,3C)
Issues, concepts, and techniques of citizen participation in community development. Institutional frameworks and their historical precedents. Exercises developing group communications skills, public meeting facilitation, and design of community involvement programs. Pre: Senior standing required. (3H,3C)
UAP 4224: Policy-making in the Federal System

UAP 4244: Non-profit Organization and Management

Issues in applied environmental ethics. Contributions of diverse religious and philosophical traditions to contemporary perspectives on the human-nature relationship. Examination of environmental policies from utilitarian economic, deep ecology, and ecofeminist perspectives. Junior, senior or graduate standing required. (3H,3C)
This course examines the legal principles and policy debates involved in the regulation and protection of critical environmental resources. Specific topics vary but will likely include wetlands law and policy, endangered species habitat, open space, forestland and farmland protection, coastal zone management, and floodplain regulation and policy. (3H,3C)
Environmental factors involved in land use planning and development, including topography, soils, geologic hazards, flooding and stormwater management, ecological features, and visual quality. Techniques used in conducting environmental land inventories and land suitability analyses. Policies and programs to protect environmental quality in land use planning and development. Pre: Junior standing. (3H,3C)
Planning and policy aspects of managing residuals and environmental contaminants and their effects on human health and environmental quality. Technical and economic factors involved in management of water quality, air quality, solid and hazardous wastes, toxic substances, and noise. Implementation of pollution control legislation, policies, and programs at federal, state, and local levels. (3H,3C)
Practical design fundamentals for small scale renewable energy systems: solar building heating and cooling; solar domestic hot water; wind, photovoltaic, and hydroelectric systems; alcohol, methane and other biomass conversion systems. Developing plans, programs, and policies to stimulate development of renewable systems. Pre: (MATH 1016 or MATH 1025). (3H,3C)
UAP 4604: Social Policy and Planning

This seminar is the integrative forum for the principal elements of the Washington Semester experience. The course explores both the role of political institutions in policy formation and implementation and the primary managerial and leadership challenges that arise for implementing organization managers in American democratic public policy-making. Pre: Junior standing or instructor consent and acceptance into the Washington Semester program. X-grade allowed. (3H,3C)
This course is part of the Washington Semester. Explores the relationship between the imperatives of democratic mobilization, policy choices and organizational choices through intensive study of the operating context of a selected public or nonprofit organization. Examines implications of policy-maker choices for implementing institution dynamics and challenges. Pre: Junior standing and acceptance into the Washington Semester program required. X-grade allowed. Pre: PSCI 3714. (3H,3C)
Examines the provision and financing of public goods and services in local governments. Analyzes associated policy issues. Reviews experience in Western Europe and developing countries, as well as in the United States. Must complete prerequisites UAP 3024 with B- grade or higher, and ECON 2005 and 2006 with C grade or higher. Pre: 3024, (ECON 2005 or ECON 2005H), (ECON 2006 or ECON 2006H). (3H,3C)
Introduction to real estate, including markets, land use planning and zoning, development, finance, construction, sales, marketing, management and property valuation. Examines the key actors and processes in each of these areas. Explores major public policies impacting real estate.
Examination of the legal context in which urban planning and public policy operate. Legal structure, role of law, powers of sovereign governments, constitutional limitations on government activities, and public-private conflict and their influence on planning and public policy are examined. Pre: Junior standing required. (3H,3C)
Examination of major development theories and contemporary issues and characteristics of low-income societies (industrialization, urbanization, migration, rural poverty, hunger, foreign trade, and debt) that establish contexts for development planning and policy-making. Junior standing required. (3H,3C)
Course examines the interdependences among the elements of the built environment of the city and those between the elements of the built environment and the policy/planning structure of the city. Considered are those elements associated with the primary urban activities (residential, commercial, industrial) as well as the urban form-giving infrastructure facilities that support those land uses (water supply, sewerage, solid waste disposal, transportation, education, recreation, health, and safety). Pre: UAP 3224. (3H,3C)
UAP Faculty
SPIA Contacts

Ralph Hall, Undergraduate Program Director
201 Architecture Annex
540-231-7332 | rphall@vt.edu

Chris LaPlante, Undergraduate Advisor
209 Architecture Annex
(540) 231-3831 | chrisl@vt.edu

Myriam Lechuga, Graduate Student Coordinator
(703) 706-8111 | mlechuga@vt.edu

SPIA Locations

Washington D.C.
1021 Prince Street | Alexandria, VA 22314

Contact SPIA

Security Code:
security code
Please enter the security code:

Submit
REQUEST INFORMATION

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

BLACKSBURG

WASHINGTON, DC

RICHMOND

BLACKSBURG

WASHINGTON, DC

RICHMOND

BLACKSBURG

WASHINGTON, DC

RICHMOND