IPG_Child and Family Social Welfare Policy 2018-03-08T17:56:28+00:00

     IPG

         Child & Family Social Welfare Policy

      IPG

        Child & Family Social Welfare Policy

Child & Family Social Welfare Policy

Institute faculty and their partners are working in this domain to understand better the implications and dynamics of child protection, foster care placement and transfer payment policies, including Temporary Aid to Needy Families, Medicaid Title IVE funding and child care subsidy. More broadly, the Institute is active in this area to develop deeper knowledge of the tensions and assumptions that underpin current social policy design at all levels of American governance, to chart alternatives to existing choices and examine their likely implications for those served and those providing assistance and to explore creative strategies to improve policy implementation (service) outcomes. This work is undertaken in partnership with representatives of national, state and local governments as well as nonprofit organizations as necessary and appropriate.

SERVICES & RESEARCH

1994 – Current – Federal Reimbursement Unit (FRU)- Fairfax VA

The VTIPG Federal Reimbursement Unit has ongoing responsibilities to facilitate a collection of centralized processes to support the Fairfax County Department of Family Services (DFS). This includes the following:

  1. secure child support from non-custodial parents on behalf of children in foster care.
  2. to access federal funds on behalf of the children in foster care
  3. to pursue Medicaid funding for all Children’s Services Act (CSA) funded youth placed out of their homes
  4. to ensure compliance with CSA requirements to secure state matching funds
  5. to assess Parental Contributions
  6. do CSA case file reviews, CANS reports, distribution of reports, perform related training and other related CSA duties.

The FRU reviews records of children in foster care placement with the County and supports the process for reimbursements for those children. The reimbursement of local expenditures via federal funds reduces the local costs of providing services to children in foster care (expended through the CSA).

Our goals:

  • Continue to refine the process so that, where possible, fewer County tax dollars will be spent to support children who are in foster care placement and children in receipt of CSA pool funds and more will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children
  • Access funds for reimbursement, based upon each child’s eligibility,
    • include Title II and XVI—Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits, Survivors’ Benefits (SSA)
    • Title XIX – Medicaid benefits
    • Title IV-D – Child Support
    • CSA Parental Contributions
  • Contractor will recover the maximum allowable amount of federal/state reimbursements.

Why Access These Resources?

  • Fewer County tax dollars will be spent to support children who are in foster care placement and children in receipt of CSA pool funds and more will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children

Who Are Our Stakeholders?

Fairfax County Department of Family Services, Child Protective Services and Foster Care and Adoptions Program

FRU Contact Information:

Questions? Comments? Please contact:

Melony A. Price-Rhodes, PhD
Senior Program Director, National Capital Region,
Virginia Tech, School of Public and International Affairs, Institute for Policy and Governance Principal Investigator and Project Director, Federal Reimbursement Unit
12011 Government Center Parkway Ste. 620
Fairfax, VA 22035

Email: mpricerh@vt.edu
Phone: 703.324.7309

RESEARCH & OUTREACH


AmeriCorps Reading Hour Program 2014 – 2017

About the Program:

The VT AmeriCorps Reading Hour is a literacy and mentoring program in which adult volunteers from the community and local businesses travel to a nearby child care center once a week or once every other week, and read one-on-one to a student. The volunteer spends 30 minutes reading and interacting with their Reading Friend. 

Reading Hour aims to increase children’s prospects for success in school and in life via reading experiences with caring adults. Through our Reading Hour program, we reach children while they are young, stimulate their interest in reading and learning, and encourage them to believe that they, too, can be successful.

Our goals:

  • To generate enthusiasm for books and reading.
  • To improve children’s listening comprehension, vocabulary, ability to articulate thoughts, and background knowledge (fundamental literacy skills).
  • To increase children’s self-esteem through consistent weekly attention from their mentors.
  • To provide flexible, convenient volunteer experiences for area professionals.
  • To bring community support and resources into local childcare centers and expose children to people of diverse cultures and backgrounds.

Why Read Aloud to Children?

“The single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading is reading aloud to children.”

–National Commission on Reading, Becoming a Nation of Readers Report, 1985

In response to the National Commission on Reading’s landmark 1985 report, Becoming a Nation of Readers, and other such studies Smart Beginnings NRV has created the Reading Hour, a program in which adult volunteers are matched, one-to-one, with children to read aloud to them at their daycare center. Read aloud, by definition, involves an adult reading out loud to a child or children in order to foster a love of reading and to expose the child/children to a variety of vocabulary, language patterns, story structures, genres and authors. When read to, children are exposed to more complex language and vocabulary than they encounter in their own reading and as a result their reading skills improve.

What are Corporate Partners?

Corporate Partners provide Smart Beginnings New River Valley with both volunteers and support. SBNRV in turn manages the Reading Hour, taking full responsibility for program coordination. Employee volunteers of our corporate partners enjoy a rewarding community service experience, miss little or no work time, and feel excited to be part of a company that supports their involvement in the local community.

Reading Hour Contact Information:

Questions? Comments? Interested in volunteering or becoming a corporate partner? Want to get your daycare center involved? Please contact:

David Moore
Smart Beginnings New River Valley
201 W. Roanoke St. (0489), Blacksburg, VA 24061
Email: sbnrvreadinghour@gmail.com
Phone: 540-553-1454

Partnership in Self-Sufficiency 2000 – 2012

Guided by Mary Beth Dunkenberger and Holly Lesko, VTIPG and five Local Departments of Social Services (LDSS) in the New River Valley, collectively known as the Partners for Self-Sufficiency (PSS), provides wrap around services to address Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) clients’ employment barriers and service needs in an individualized manner. The existing partnership expands and engages the existing community networks of both employers and human service providers with an emphasis on intensive vocational case management through referral to Vocational Specialists in each of the five New River Valley jurisdictions.

The overarching goal of our regional employment placement, retention, and advancement model is to expedite preparation of Virginia Initiative for Employment Not Welfare (VIEW) participants for entry-level positions with employers who offer benefit packages, greater job security, and some potential for upgrading skills and to provide a strong focus on job retention. In addition to employment-based services, the PSS program focuses on other barriers clients face in life that influences job readiness and retention.  Specific research and programmatic efforts have been directed to assess needs and services in areas such as domestic violence, mental illness, disability assessments, and multi-generational poverty prevention efforts.

The services provided are 1) the integration of our intensive job readiness program, job development activities, and concentrated vocational case management activities; 2) continued development and refinement of community resources that facilitate employment of TANF recipients; 3) an SSI/SSDI application support service that helps local agencies better evaluate disabled TANF recipients and helps provide access to additional resources to assist them; and 4) focused job retention efforts coordinated with employers. The PSS program has been operating in the region for over ten years and has served over 5,000 clients across the region during that tenure.

Virginia Department of Health (VDH) Women, Infants and Children’s Special Supplement Nutrition Program (WIC) 2011

VTIPG assisted the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) in assessing the strengths, weaknesses and gaps in utilization of the Women, Infants and Children’s Special Supplemental Nutrition (WIC) Program among foster care parents of eligible children and young women. This project also developed outreach strategies to expand the utilization of the WIC program among foster care families and children. The final report may be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

VSQI Pilot Evaluation (Family Child Care Home Demonstration of the Virginia Star Quality Initiative Evaluation Report) 2011

VTIPG faculty collaborated with the Virginia Tech Child Development Center for Learning & Research to conduct a process evaluation of the Virginia Star Quality Initiative (VSQI) pilot project.  The pilot initiative established a child care quality rating, mentoring and improvement system for the Commonwealth’s home based child care providers.   Researchers at Virginia Tech were selected to conduct an evaluation of the draft home-based provider Standards, a process evaluation of the pilot program, and to suggest future directions for ensuring the long-term feasibility, quality and sustainability of extending VSQI to family child care providers. Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Hope Co-Location (Co-location of Health Care Services with HOPE, Inc. An Assessment of Options) 2011

VTIPG and the Virginia Tech Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE) have conducted an assessment of several options for HOPE, Inc. (HOPE) to co-locate health care services along with other HOPE service providers. The evaluation has appraised the appropriateness and viability of two distinct care providers – The Brock Hughes Free Clinic (BHFC) and the Bland County Medical Clinic to co-locate health services with HOPE to serve low income individuals and families. This assessment builds on previous health needs assessments conducted in the Wythe-Bland region but specifically focuses on the viable options for the use of the HOPE, Inc. office space. Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Responsible Rides Program Evaluation 2011

VTIPG conducted  an evaluation overview of the impact of the Responsible Rides program for participants in the first year of the program. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify the short-term impacts of the program and provide insight into potential changes necessary for continued program success.  The evaluation was structured to identify key employment and income as well as personal impacts of car ownership.  To a limited extent the evaluation also assessed the strengths and weaknesses of the process utilized to engage participants in the program.  Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Virginia Rural Health Association Policy Brief (Veteran’s Health Care in Rural Virginia) 2011

VTIPG collaborated with the Virginia Rural Health Association’s (VRHA) to develop issues brief on the status and needs related to veterans’ health.  The issue brief and supplements are available at http://www.vrha.org/legislation_policy.php

Virginia Wounded Warrior Program Needs and Gaps Assessment 2010

VTIPG faculty and graduate students collaborated with the Virginia Tech Center for Survey Research and the Virginia Tech Center for Geospatial Information Technology to conduct a comprehensive study of veteran’s needs, experiences and service gaps in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The study was commissioned by the Virginia Wounded Warrior Program, which has been charged with coordinating and facilitating the services that are needed by Virginia’s veterans who have served in the United States military, particularly those who have served in the Gulf War conflicts.  The research has been utilized to inform policy and program development for the Virginia Department of Veteran Services and the VWWP. The final report may be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Generations United Report: Intergenerational Shared Sites Save Money

Funded by a grant from MetLife Foundation, Dr. Shannon Jarrott from Virginia Tech’s Department for Human Development and Dr. Aaron Schroeder and Owen Perkins from VTIPG completed an exploratory study for Generations United which shows that intergenerational shared site programs can save money through sharing expenses.  These findings are a result of the first national analysis of cost-savings in intergenerational shared site programs.

Generations United (GU) is the national membership organization focused solely on improving the lives of children, youth, and older people through intergenerational strategies, programs, and public policies. GU represents more than 100 national, state, and local organizations and individuals representing more than 70 million Americans. Since 1986 GU has served as a resource for educating policymakers and the public about the economic, social, and personal imperatives of intergenerational cooperation. GU acts as a catalyst for stimulating collaboration between aging, children, and youth organizations, providing a forum to explore areas of common ground while celebrating the richness of each generation.

For more on Generations United visit www.gu.org/. For the full report Intergenerational Shared Sites: Saving Dollars While Making Sense, click here.

Evaluation of Virginia’s Child Protective Services Program

In 2008, under the principal investigation of Dr. Renee Loeffler, VTIPG conducted an evaluation of Virginia’s child protective services program under a contract with the Virginia Department of Social Services.  This work was a continuation of a multi-year project to assess the effects of the Differential Response System, a new approach to child protection adopted by the state in 2002.

VTIPG used statewide data on all child protective services cases in 2007 to assess outcomes and to analyze trends in key program variables.  A topic for special study in 2008 was the activities of Virginia’s local departments of social services in providing services to families to treat or prevent child abuse or neglect.  This project culminated in a report to the 2009 General Assembly.

VTIPG provided a separate report to each of Virginia’s 120 local departments of social services.  The local agency reports include local, regional and state data for key CPS program variables so that each local department can compare itself to regional neighbors and the state as a whole.

SSI Advocacy for Employment Options (SAFE) 2006 – 2009

Mary Beth Dunkenberger and Nancy White led the SSI Advocacy for Employment Options (SAFE) initiative to develop and deliver a training and technical assistance model for disability assessment and SSI advocacy for the TANF and VIEW programs.  The training and technical assistance was delivered to local departments of social services (LDSS) staff throughout the Commonwealth by Hazel B. Smith, program expert, and Nancy White.

This program focused on the identification and assessment of disabilities in persons participating in the TANF program with an emphasis on the Social Security Administration (SSA) definition of disability as related to Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).  Building this capacity will enable LDSS staff in the assessment process to determine if persons with disabilities may be served with accommodations in moving toward employment or if the disability appears so severe that a referral to the SSI program would be more appropriate.

The determination of a disability by LDSS staff as early in the assessment process as possible allows for a more efficient use of time sensitive recourses and will enable LDSS staff to inform TANF participants of the procedures, policies, and timeframes related to SSA determination of disability.  Local agencies will be able to structure a disability program that best meets the unique needs of the locality and participant population. The ultimate goal is that after the initial collaborative period, LDSS will have the capacity and organizational knowledge to assess TANF participant disabilities and provide ongoing SSI Advocacy services to TANF and VIEW participants as appropriate under policy and to meet the needs of the participant.

Fairfax County Federal Reimbursement Unit (FRU)

The FRU has ongoing responsibilities to facilitate the collection of centralized processes to secure child support from non-custodial parents on behalf of the children in foster care, to access Federal funds on behalf of children in foster care, and to pursue Medicaid funding for certain Medicaid eligible services for CSA funded youth placed out of their homes.

Under the guidance of Melony Price-Rhodes, the FRU reviews records of children in foster care and supports the process for reimbursements for those children. The reimbursement of local expenditures via federal funds reduces the local costs (expended by the Department of Family Services and through the Comprehensive Services Act (CSA)) of providing services to children in foster care.

The FRU continues to refine the process so that, where possible, fewer County tax dollars are spent to support children who are in foster care and in receipt of CSA pool funds.  More funds will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children.  Funds accessed for reimbursement, based upon each child’s eligibility, include Title IV-E, Title II and XVI – Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits, Survivors’ Benefits (SSA), Title XIX – Medicaid benefits and Title IV-D – Child Support.

Loudoun County, VA Comprehensive Services Act Program

Melony Price-Rhodes, Project Associate at VTIPG facilitated case reviews of foster care children in Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of identifying a group of funds for 70 to 100 foster care cases for children that are in foster care in Loudoun County, Virginia. The groups of funds include, Title IV-E, Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Benefits and Child Support. The case reviews will assess the efficacy of the current efforts by Loudoun County staff to maximize revenues for children in foster care.

Child and Family Services Review (FY 2005 – FY 2007)

VTIPG contracted with VDSS to conduct a two year program improvement plan for the Child and Family Services Review. IPG deployed a nine member team that included two graduate research assistants to review approximately 1700 foster care and child protective services cases. The results of each case review were included in an agency specific report with recommendations for each locality which was assembled into a statewide assessment of the aggregate data to meet 14 federally mandated performance goals.

Federal Reimbursement Unit Technical Assistance Team (FRU-TAT) 2001-2007

The Federal Resource Utilization Technical Assistance Team (FRU-TAT) created in 2001 under contract with The Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) and the Institute for Policy Outreach (IPO) had four active and distinct components – 1) Title IV-E review and program improvement; 2) SSI research and advocacy for Foster Care and TANF populations; 3) development of Automated Eligibility System; and 4) adoption subsidy analysis and review.

The FRU (2005-2007) provided quality assurance to VDSS in preparation for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) secondary review of Virginia’s Title IV-E foster care program conducted in March 2007.  On-site reviews of LDSS Title IV-E foster care case records selected by VDSS were conducted by the FRU during Phases I, II, and III by reviewing a total of 5,357 cases to ensure that cases identified as title IV-E eligible in OASIS met federal statutory eligibility requirements for foster care maintenance payments. The Specialists conducted payment record reviews on a pre-selected number of Title IV-E cases during the on-site reviews. They also conducted a financial records desk review of one Title IV-E case from each LDSS that reported a title IV-E payment case type in OASIS immediately prior to the secondary review. The financial reviews determined if title IV-E eligible cases were appropriately utilizing federal financial reimbursement.  The specialist served as regional consultants in the area of Title IV-E eligibility and in that capacity provided case consultation, monitoring, training, and technical assistance to LDSS on an as needed basis. At the conclusion of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) secondary review of Virginia’s Title IV-E foster care program, the Commonwealth of Virginia was considered to be in substantial compliance.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) efforts were focused on reviewing foster care records and making application for SSI on behalf of foster care children with identified disabilities.  A SSI-TANF effort was launched in Virginia Beach with a team member permanently stationed at Virginia Beach DSS to review and make applications for adults with disabilities who are currently participating in the VIEW program. At the conclusion of the project the team had an 85% application approval rate.

CURRICULUM

One of VTIPG’s responsibilities is to work with the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) and its academic programs to develop and propose nonprofit and nongovernmental organization related curricula at the undergraduate and graduate levels including concentrations, graduate certificates and potentially a freestanding graduate degree program in Nonprofit/ Nongovernmental Organization Management. Irrespective of specific content, the nonprofit/nongovernmental offerings share a number of characteristics, such as interdisciplinary faculty, a comparative focus, and integration of theory, practice and public policy implications.

Degree Concentrations

The concentration in public and nonprofit management in SPIA offers interested students the opportunity to study, in depth, public and nonprofit organization management tools, techniques, processes and policy contexts. Students may also pursue an additional focus in budgeting and financial management.

Doctoral Program

Students who wish to continue their studies in public and nonprofit management can matriculate into the inter-disciplinary doctoral program in Planning, Governance and Globalization (PGG). The program provides students with the flexibility to design a course of study that best meets their interests. Students in this PGG stream have engaged in research related to strategic planning processes in localities, health care in Africa, evaluation of long-term care, social class and migration, self-help housing and risk assessment.

Graduate Certificates

The School of Public and International Affairs currently offers a 12 hour certificate in Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organization Management. There is an online certificate option that includes many of the nonprofit courses and can be completed completely online.  See the Certificate Overview in the Virginia Tech Graduate Catalog for additional information.

How to Apply

Virginia Tech graduate students who are currently enrolled and working toward a degree should use the following to apply for entrance into the graduate certificate program in Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organization Management (NNMC). Individuals interest in enrolling in Virginia Tech and pursuing the graduate certificate should apply online at the Virginia Tech Graduate School website. The form can be found here.

AFFILIATED COURSES


UAP 5084G – Advanced Community Involvement 
Issues, concepts, and techniques of citizen participation in community development and planning. Theoretical foundation, instituational frameworks, and historical evolution of participatory democracy. Exercises developing group communication skills, public meeting facilitation, and design of community involvement programs. Pre-requisite: Graduate Standing Required
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5454 – Nonprofit Organization & Management 
Examines the nonprofit sector in American society and compares those roles with the roles the sector plays in other advanced democracies as well as in developing countries. Also analyzes the role of important sub sectors within the nation’s third sector and explores key management challenges confronting non-profit organization leaders with them. Compares those challenges to those found in nongovernmental organizations in developing nations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Undergraduate, Graduate

UAP 5534 – Nonprofit Organization Leadership and Governance 
Major conceptual issues related to developing an understanding of the foundations and roles of leadership and governance of third sector and nongovernmental organizations. Comparison of nongovernmental organizations in the U.S. and around the world. The course is designed to equip students with the capacities to assess and improve organizational governance effectiveness as well as to devise and implement leadership strategies in the complex structural, social and political contexts in which these organizations are typically enmeshed in the United States as well as in other industrialized democracies and in developing nations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Undergraduate, Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5034 – Democratic Governance in the Economy 
An international and comparative examination of workplace and economic relations around the world, with special focus on efforts to build collaborative work processes that would extend the voice, ownership and control rights of workers. The interface between state institutions and economic organizations is also considered, especially insofar as government prescriptions and processes that may impede or extend democratic governance of the economy. Graduate Standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA 5154 – Global Accountabilities
Provides a comparative perspective on “accountability” among nonprofit and non-governmental organizations, private corporations, governmental organizations, and inter-governmental organizations. Theories and practices of accountability, reporting, monitoring, compliance and learning are considered.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PSCI 5164 – Collaborative Governance and Civil Society 
Theoretical foundations of collaborative policy and governance approaches are examined. Strategies and methods for forming and sustaining collaborative coalitions are discussed. Case studies are used to illustrate the effectiveness of collaborative approaches in different policy domains. I
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA 5274 – Comparative Social Movements
This course will investigate the forms of public protest that occur all over the world, with special attention to activism in poor nations and to the recent emergence of transnational movements. Also examines why and when governments repress social movements. Explores movements that are grounded in collective identities based in class, race/ethnicity, gender, religion, and culture. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5354 – Charity, Philanthropy and Civil Society 
This course treats the evolution of philanthropy and charity in the United States and abroad and introduces major issues and continuing concerns linked to the institutiuons engaged in these activities while exploring their ties to civil society. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate
Instruction Type: Lecture

UAP 5364 – Non-Governmental Organizations in International Development 
Explores theory and cases of non-governmental organizations in international development. Analyzes various roles of NGOs, and their interactions with local communities, government agencies, international organizations, and private businesses. Examines tensions and collaborations between NGOs and other development actors, drawing from cases in environmental, health, and educational policy domains. II.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5444 – Strategic Planning and Management 
An examination of different processes and procedures for generic planning and management of a strategic nature. Particular emphasis on analytical techniques, especially Artificial Intelligence, that are used in the process.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5474 – Program Evaluation
Conceptual approaches and methodological techniques for evaluating national, regional, and local human services programs. Examination of issues relevant to the function of evaluation research and the role of evaluators.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5514 – Public Budgeting and Management 
Examines public budgeting and management theories, concepts, policies, processes, and practices, and their effects on federal, state, and local governments. Theoretical aspects of budgeting and management control are related to practical budgeting issues and exercises. Attention is also given to the internal management of the budgeting function.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PAPA 5544 – Public and Nonprofit Financial Management 
Examines concepts central to effective financial management of public and non-profit organizations. Affords students an opportunity to further their understanding of the relationship between financial accounting and reporting systems and effective organization management. II
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5564 – Information Technology, Society, and Public Policy 
Social impacts of new and emerging information technologies from a public policy perspective. Technical nature of IT and influences of IT on four core dimensions of society: political, economic, cultural, and spatial. Course integrates theoretical and philosophical literature on IT with applied policy and planning issues.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PSCI 5574 – Arts, Culture and Society
Considers the role of the arts in society, including architecture, music companies, or theater productions to heritage sites, science museums, and art galleries. Effective arts policy in revitalizing urban economies also examined. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5594 – Nonprofit Law and Ethics
Explores the legal, ethical and normative systems affecting nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations, both domestically and internationally. Examines the historical foundations of legal regulation and professional ethics within the sector and how these systems contribute to the administration and governance of nonprofit and nongovernamental organizations. Also surveys current theories of nonprofit/nongovernmental organization regulation as well as major legal and ethical issues confronting the sector. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PAPA 5694 – Asset Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations 
Provides an understanding of asset management for governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental entities. Focuses on the essentials of cash budgeting and cash management, investment of endowments and pension funds, and debt management and debt financing for governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5974 – Independent Study
Credit Hours: 1 to 19
Lecture Hours: 1 to 19
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5984 – Special Study
Credit Hours: 1 to 19
Lecture Hours: 1 to 10
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 5674 – Financial Health of Public and Nonprofit Organizations 
Concepts and analytical capacities necessary to evaluate the overall level of financial health of governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations. Examines the tools and techniques necessary to assess the financial condition of the organizations and to determie if they have the capacity to carry out their purposes and address their debt obligations. Graduate Standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6114 – Complex Public Organizations
Examines the principal conceptual and theoretical bases for understanding the structure and environment of complex public organizations; also explores the problems bureaucracy poses for democratic theory and for vigorous economy.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6124 – Behavior and Change in Public Organizations 
Dynamics of behavior and change process in public sector organizations are examined for: (1) their implications for individuals, groups, and society; and (2) their impact upon organizational productivity and public policy. Critical dimensions of leadership as a sociopsychological process in management are emphasized with special reference to the public sector and public executives. The course also surveys the various types and strategies for planned change in public sector organizations.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6324 – Public Personnel Processes and Their Policy Implications 
Surveys the key personnel processes of public organizations, the contrasting norms and behaviors of participants, their impacts on policy, and their implications for democracy.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA 5004 – Power and Policy in the U.S.
Social science theory and research on the distribution of power in the US, especially as it shapes important national policy outcomes. Institutional and class bases of power will be examined, including membership on corporate boards and in policy-shaping think tanks. Implications for democracy in society will be drawn. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA 5004 – Community Involvement
Social science theory and research on the distribution of power in the US, especially as it shapes important national policy outcomes. Institutional and class bases of power will be examined, including membership on corporate boards and in policy-shaping think tanks. Implications for democracy in society will be drawn. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5454 – Advanced Topics in Information Technology & Public Policy 
In-depth study and critical evaluation of selected complex issues related to information technology, society, governance, and public policy. Focused attention is given to theoretical and methodological foundations of the area of inquiry and to specific domains of policymaking and implementation. Topics will be selected from IT-related issues in such areas of concern as: cities, local communities, nonprofit organizations, governments, and global networks. May be repeated on a different topic. Must meet prerequisite or have permission of instructor.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5554 – Culture, Politics and Society in Network Environments 
Historical origins, institutional foundations, and theoretical interpretations of cultural, political, and social interaction through computer mediated communication are examined. Particular attention is given to new types of discourse, sources of power, and structures of society at all geographical levels in global computer and communications networks.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5554 – Democracy Begond the Ballot 
Forms of ultra or enhanced democracy outside of state institutions, particulary those developing in third sector organizations, theories of democracy and research on functioning deliberative democracies at the grassroots level, in societal or international institutions. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 6224 – Competing Conceptions of the Third Sector
Competing Conceptions of the Third Sector Competing theories and conceptions of the third sector in relation to the for-profit firm and the state with international perspectives on voluntary grassroots action challenges and societal transformation. Integration of theoretical and research literatures in the field. Graduate Standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

FACULTY



Max Stephenson, Jr.
IPG Director

Research Areas:

  • Nonprofit/NGO governance, leadership, management & civil society
  • Public policy & policy theory
  • Peacebuilding, international development & democratization
  • Environmental politics, policy & planning

Email | Read CV

Mary Beth Dunkenberger 
Senior Program Director & Business Manager, Blacksburg

Research Areas:

  • Connections between social programs, economic & community development
  • Organizational and program assessments
  • Policy and program innovations

Email | Read Bio

Melony Price-Rhodes, Ph. D. 
Senior Program Director, Alexandria

Research Areas:

  • Child welfare, revenue maximization, foster care and child protective services
  • Federal and state regulations affecting Federal Reimbursement Unit activities

Email | Photography Collection

David Moore
Senior Research Associate, Project Director (TAP) Swiftstart

Research Areas:

  • Nonprofit/NGO & governance, leadership, management & civil society
  • Public policy & policy theory
  • Early childhood & workforce development
  • Organizational development & capacity building

Email | Read Bio

Elizabeth Allen
Assistant Business Manager, Program Research Associate, Data Manager

Research Areas:

  • Develop and maintain data management for asset mapping/web portal prototype and gap analyses
  • Administer and report results of on-line survey instruments
  • Coordinate and co-facilitate focus groups/structured interviews
  • Report preparation and generate tables and charts for stakeholder meetings and project contractors

Email | Read Bio

Maya Berinzon
Research Associate

Research Areas:

  • Law & International Development
  • Comparative Law
  • Access to information
  • Regional focus in sub-Saharan Africa


Don Back
VTIPG Senior Fellow

Research Areas:

  • Higher Education Financing, Governance and Leadership
  • Higher Education Policy and Practice
  • Internationalization of Higher Education
  • International Development

Email | Bio

Andy Morikawa
VTIPG Senior Fellow

Email

Martha Mead
VTIPG Fellow

Email

Minnis Ridenour
VTIPG Fellow, Resource Development

Research Areas:

  • Resource development
  • Financial management for governmental & nonprofit organizations

Email | Read Bio

George Still
VTIPG Fellow

Research Areas:

  • Support IPG / Pursue Grants
  • Consultation
  • Assist with reports & articles for publication

Edward Weisband
VTIPG Fellow, Endowed Chair, Political Science

Research Areas:

  • International monitoring regimes
  • Global accountabilities
  • Core international labor standard

Email | Read Bio


Suzanne Lo
Project Associate

Marcy Schnitzer
Assistant Provost for Diversity and Strategic Planning

Katy Powell
Professor of English and Director of the Center for Rhetoric in Society

Nancy White
Senior Consultant

Research Areas:

  • Policy design
  • Administration
  • Nonprofit and nongovernmental organizational evaluations

Email | Read Bio

Lyusyena Kirakosyan
VTIPG Senior Project Associate

Email

Rachel Christensen
VTIPG Senior Project Associate

STAFF


Karen Boone
Financial Manager

Responsibilities:

  • Finances
  • Payroll – Wage
  • Travel
  • Human Resources
  • Reconciling
  • Facilities
  • Maintain Records

540-231-1118
Email

Regina Naff
Administrative Assistant

Responsibilities:

  • Administrative Assistant to the Director
  • Fixed Assets Manager
  • Web Content Coordinator
  • Editor of the IPG Quarterly Newsletter
  • Secondary assistance for miscellaneous office procedures

540-231-6775
Email

Wanda Mills
Web Content Administrator

Responsibilities:

  • Web Designer
  • Digital Content Management
  • IPG Website Administration

Email

Hazel Smith – Consulting Staff
Researcher

Responsibilities:

  • SSI Advocacy for Adults & Children

Email | Read Bio

Tanisha Capers
Project Specialist

Responsibilities:

  • Provides administrative and logistics support to the FRU management and staff
  • Human Resources Information System (HRIS) Banner representative
  • Assist with activities that secure initial and continued eligibility for children in receipt of CSA funds for other public assistance programs, specifically Title II (Social Security), Title IV-E, Title IV-D (Child Support), Title XVI (Supplemental Security Income)

Email

Vickie Grazioli
Data Entry Technician

Responsibilities:

  • Provides technical support to the FRU Medicaid Case Analyst in obtaining appropriate collateral information to evaluate initial and continuing eligibility for continuing Comprehensive Services (CSA) and Title XIX (Medicaid) eligibility for each child served by Fairfax County Comprehensive Services Act (CSA).

Email

Claudia Malenich
Court Specialist

Responsibilities:

  • Prepare and file Civil Petitions for Support at the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court
  • Perform all activities related to establishing Judicial Support Orders (JSOs) in juvenile court
  • Maintain accurate knowledge of relevant federal and state law, rules and regulations for Title IV-D funding

Email

Erin Mooney
Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Determine the initial eligibility of children in receipt of CSA funds for other public assistance programs, specifically Title II (Social Security), Title IV-E (AFDC-FC), Title IV-D (Child Support), Title XVI (Supplemental Security Income), and to maintain the child’s continuing eligibility
  • Comprehensive knowledge of complex federal and state laws governing public assistance programs
  • Ability to research, obtain, interpret, and integrate information from many sources
  • Thorough knowledge of physiological and mental health impairments. Expertise in assessing and evaluating functional limitations based on medical and/or mental health records

Email

Peter Flint
FRU CSA Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Process Comprehensive Services Act (CSA) copayment assessments for CSA supported agencies
  • Primary point of contact regarding the copayment process for CSA supported agencies
  • Research, analyze, and prepare statistics and information to assist the FRU Project Director with contract deliverables as necessary

Email

Brian Zamora
FRU CSA Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Analyze state uniform assessment instrument-the CANS document. Contact case manager if follow-up is required
  • Maintain accurate knowledge of relevant federal and state laws, local regulations, policies, and practices through reviews of publications, communications and training sessions with CSA and FRU management and staff
  • Research, analyze, and prepare statistics and information to assist the Project Director with contract deliverables as necessary. Provide Project Director and relevant CSA management and staff (as requested) with data and assistance as necessary for projects

Email

AFFILIATED STUDENTS


Master’s Students

Henry Ayakwah (MURP)
Leeann Budzevski (MURP)
Erin Burcham (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Nathan Corso (MPIA-MIP)
Dinah Girma (MURP)
Beth Olberding (MURP/MNR-MIP)
Lara Nagle (MURP)

Ph.D. Students

  Carmen Boggs-Parker (PGG)
Lindy Cranwell (PGG)
Mary Beth Dunkenberger (PAPA)
Jeremy Elliott-Engel (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Rachel Gabriele (PGG)
Benjamin Grove (PGG)
Vanessa Guerra (PGG)
Sarah Hanks (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Jake Keyel (PGG)
Kyunghee Kim (Arch.and Design)
Kristin Kirk (PGG)
Sarah Lyon-Hill (PGG)
Lorien MacAuley (Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education)
Neda Moayerian (PGG)
Cheryl Montgomery (PGG)
David Moore (PAPA)
Oladayo Omosa (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Hamza Safouane (PGG)
Danny White (PGG)

Research PhD Students

 Laura Nelson – PhD (Human Development)

Visiting PhD Students

Yunyun Chen
Chunxue Mu

Congratulations the following VTIPG Affiliated Students who recently obtained their master’s:

Kaitlyn Fitzgerald (MPIA), May 2017
Kristin Haas (MPIA), May 2017
Heather Lyne (MPIA) May 2017
Natalie Patterson (MURP), May 2017

Congratulations the following VTIPG Affiliated Students who recently obtained their Ph.D.:

 Lorien MacAuley (Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education), Dec 2017

AFFILIATIONS, PARTNERS, & SPONSORS


Government Organizations
United States Forest Service
National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement, DHHS
United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Services
Virginia Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services
Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development
Virginia Department of Social Services
Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles
Council on Virginia’s Future
Fairfax County Department of Social Services
Pulaski County Department of Social Services
Giles County Department of Social Services
Montgomery County Department of Social Services
Floyd County Department of Social Services
Dinwiddie County Department of Social Services
Radford City Department of Social Services
New River Valley Planning District Commission
Arlington Economic Development
Fairfax County-Northern Virginia Nonprofit Partnership
Virginia Department of Veterans Services
Virginia Center for Innovative Technology

Nonprofit Organizations
The Women’s Resource Center of the New River Valley
Carpenter’s Shelter for Homeless Children, Families and Adults
United Way of Henry County and Martinsville
New River Community Action
Generations United
Virginia Community Healthcare Association
Jefferson Center in Roanoke
Free Clinic of Franklin County
Rockbridge County Free Clinic
Southwest Virginia Second Harvest Food Bank
Brain Injury Services of Southwest Virginia, Inc.
Mental Health America of Roanoke Valley
Rescue Mission – Roanoke Valley

Foundations
Community Foundation of the New River Valley
Bertlessman Foundation
Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Carilion Foundation
Roanoke Times Landmark Communications Foundation
Ford Foundation
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
W. K. Kellogg Foundation

Centers and Institutes 
Institute for Society, Culture, and the Environment
The Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention
Virginia Bioinformatics Institute
World Disaster Risk Management Institute
Center for Gerontology
Virginia Tech Southwest Center
Virginia Tech Hampton Roads Center
Metropolitan Institute
Community Design Assistance Center
Southern Virginia Higher Education Center
Virginia Rural Health Association

DIRECTIONS

NOTICE

Parking at IPG is now under University Policy

To reach the campus from Interstate 81 (southbound and northbound):

  1. From Interstate 81, take Exit 118 to reach the exit ramps for all three of the exits at this location. There is only one exit ramp serving the exits; missing the ramp means a trip north to Exit 128 or south to Exit 114 to turn around.
  2. Take Exit 118B onto U.S. 460 West. This exit connects directly to the Christiansburg Bypass. Follow the signs for Blacksburg/Virginia Tech. The U.S. 460 bypass between Blacksburg and Christiansburg is a limited-access highway from 1-81 to the campus entrance at Southgate Drive.
  3. Watch signs carefully for routes and directions. From the bypass, Bus. U.S. 460 — South Main Street, exits to the right (take South Main Street as one route to reach downtown Blacksburg).
  4. Keep left and stay on U.S. 460 West, signed for “Virginia Tech, Bluefield” to continue directly to the university.
  5. Drive for 2.5 miles on U.S. 460 to the traffic light at VA 314, Southgate Drive. Turn right onto Southgate Drive. There is a campus map a quarter-mile on the right and the Visitor Information Center is a half-mile from U.S. 460 on the right.
  6. Continue to the stoplight at Spring Road and turn left onto Spring.
  7. Continue past Lane Stadium and Cassell Coliseum to the stop sign at Washington Street and turn right onto Washington.
  8. Continue through the stop sign at Kent Street and take the first left after the stop sign onto Otey Street.
  9. Continue past Wall Street and at the bottom of the hill turn right onto Roanoke Street.
  10. We are the last house on the right (at the corner of Roanoke Street and Draper Road).

CONTACT US

Let VTIPG and Virginia Tech put theory and knowledge to work for you! If you are interested in collaborating with us, please contact us:

The Institute is located in Alexandria and Blacksburg, Virginia.

Regina Naff
Administrative Assistant
Institute for Policy & Governance
201 West Roanoke Street (0489)
Blacksburg, VA 24061
Office: (540) 231-6775
Fax: (540) 231-6722
E-mail: regina50@vt.edu


Dr. Melony Price-Rhodes
Senior Program Director
Institute for Policy & Governance
1021 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Office: (703) 324-7309
E-mail: mpricerh@vt.edu

For more information, please contact the Institute’s Director.

Dr. Max O. Stephenson, Jr.
201 West Roanoke St.
Blacksburg , VA 24061
Office: (540) 231-7340
E-mail: mstephen@vt.edu

NEWS

Second Volume of RE:Reflections and Explorations Now Published

Colleagues and friends, I am delighted to inform you that the second volume in the RE: Reflections and Explorations series has now been published. You may find an electronic version of this new book, edited by myself and Lyusyena Kirakosyan here: http://doi.org/10.21061/vtipg.re.v2.  We will be holding a reception to celebrate this occasion in early February and will send along notice of that event in due course. Meanwhile, Happy Holidays to you and yours from the Institute for Policy and Governance at Virginia Tech!

Best wishes, Max

Veterans in Society Conference – Call for Papers

The 4th Annual Veterans in Society Conference will be held on March 26-28, 2018 at the Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center, Roanoke, VA.

Proposals due January 6, 2017

Veterans, Globalized: Veterans and their Societies in International Perspective

The Conference takes issues raised by the First World War as its point of departure to encourage research and generate scholarly conversations across disciplines and eras that consider the interplay of veterans and their societies in transnational or international perspective. To that end, we foresee juxtaposing explicitly comparative work with scholarship that delves into specific national, cultural, or historical contexts.

For more information, here is the link for the conference:  http://www.cpe.vt.edu/vis/

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary (250th) has been posted!!

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted:  Fear and the Moral Imagination: The Oil and Water of Democratic Self-Governance.

Note to Readers: This essay marks a milestone, as it is the 250th Soundings—the column first appeared on January 17, 2010. Thank you to all who have encouraged me to write these commentaries and who have offered their comments, positive and negative, concerning my efforts. I am very much in your debt. The next Soundings will appear on January 8, 2018. Happy Holidays to all! MOS

Neda Moayerian passed her Prelim defense

We are happy to announce that Neda Moayerian passed her Prelim defense on Monday, November 27. She is ready to advance to the next stage of the PhD program, the Proposal Defense. Her Doctoral advisory committee members are: Kwame Harrison (Sociology), Nancy McGhee (Tourism and Hospitality Management), Laura Zanotti (Political Science) and chair, Max Stephenson (Professor of Public and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for Policy and Governance). Congratulations Neda and best wishes going forward! We know you will do well.

Advancing the Human Condition Symposium

Several SPIA colleagues are participating this week in The Advancing the Human Condition Symposium, an Initiative of  Beyond Boundaries and The Equity and Social Disparity in the Human Condition Strategic Growth Area, November 28 – 30th and held in the Inn at VT. Max Stephenson is a discussant for the November 28th session (from 3:30 to 5:00) on Story Making as Cultural Work: Exploring Ontological Politics and Social Change in Communities of Struggle. Christian Matheis will be a panel member for the session, Interrogating what is meant by “Advancing the Human Condition” at 10:30 on November 29th. Sara Mattingly-Jordan will be a discussant for the panel Ethics and Engineering at 1:00 on the 29th. David Bieri, Ralph Hall, Max Stephenson and Christian Matheis will all participate in the session, The Beloved Community Initiative: Advancing the Human Condition through Inclusive, Sustainable Economics, 2:00 on the 30th. This session is organized jointly by the Beloved Community Initiative and the Policy Strategic Growth Area. There are many panels and promising discussions throughout both days.  Click here for the link to the schedule of events.

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted!

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted:  Reflections on Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address at Thanksgiving.

 I am posting Max’s Soundings early because I will be out of town and will not have internet access most of the time.

Wishing you and yours a very Happy and Safe Thanksgiving.  Thank you for reading and enjoy!

Danny White Passes proposal defense

Danny White, PGG PhD candidate, passed his proposal defense on Monday, November 13, 2017.  The title of his dissertation is:  “Sport and Social Capital:  Perceptions of Civil Society Organizations in Kigali, Rwanda”.  His committee includes:  Chair, Max Stephenson (Director of IPG), David Kniola (Professor School of Education), John Dooley (CEO of Virginia Tech Foundation),and Jocelyn Widmer (Director for Online Degree Programs at U of Florida).  Congratulations Danny and best wishes as you progress through the next phase of your PhD work!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Trade Agreements and Democracyby Simone Franzi, (PGG PhD student).

Thank you for reading.

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Youth as a Social Construct, by Nada Berrada, PhD student, ASPECT.

Thank you for reading and enjoy!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Strategic Use of Media in Mobilizing – Khunti Diaries, by Pallavi Raonka, PhD candidate, Scoiology.

Thank you for reading and enjoy!

Email

Urban Affairs Association 48th Annual Conference

April 4-7, 2018 | Sheraton Toronto Centre Hotel | Toronto, CN
Abstract/Session Proposal Deadline:  October 1, 2017

Shaping Justice and Sustainability Within and Beyond the City’s Edge:
Contestation and Collaboration in Urbanizing Regions

In an era of globalizing forces, the region has become an important arena for collaboration and contestation, as metropolitan areas work to craft their individual identities. As they do so, questions of equity, inclusion, and sustainability remain. What is the role of diversity, difference and singularity of social actors and communities when it comes to forging visions of urban development that are collective in process, cohesive in vision and sustainable in implementation? Furthermore, as global financial systems exert greater control over national, regional, and local economies, what is the role of innovative and/or insurgent social practices in an urbanizing region? What are the most effective strategies to create environmentally and economically sustainable communities in a regional context? How will different factions of regional actors evolve given conventional relationships, increased social and cultural diversity, and the contradictions of competitiveness and solidarity?

Abstract/Proposal Deadline: UAA will not accept any proposals (of any kind) after October 1, 2017, 12 midnight Central Daylight Time (CDT) or 5:00am GMT. The online submission site will close at 12:01 am CDT.  Acceptance or rejection notices will be sent by November 30,2017.

Questions? Visit the UAA website: http://urbanaffairsassociation.org/conference/ (for info on proposal submissions, registration,hotel reservations,etc.), or contact us at mailto:conf@uaamail.orgor 1-414-229-3025.

APSA 2016 Annual Meeting

APSA 2016 Annual Meeting
September 1-4, 2016
Great Transformations: Political Science and the Big Questions of Our Time
Philadelphia, PA

Voluntary Action History Society 25th Anniversary Conference

Voluntary Action History Society 25th Anniversary Conference
July 13-15, 2016
Thinking about the Past; Thinking about the Future
University of Liverpool

October 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

July 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

From the Director: Tidings Quarterly Reflection:

The “Beloved Community:” Aspiring to be a Truly Free and Self-Governing Society

Opportunities

Call for Submissions (deadline September 15, 2017) The Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development is seeking submissions for publication in the Continue reading 

April 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

January 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

DIRECTOR’S CORNER

Child & Family Social Welfare Policy

Institute faculty and their partners are working in this domain to understand better the implications and dynamics of child protection, foster care placement and transfer payment policies, including Temporary Aid to Needy Families, Medicaid Title IVE funding and child care subsidy. More broadly, the Institute is active in this area to develop deeper knowledge of the tensions and assumptions that underpin current social policy design at all levels of American governance, to chart alternatives to existing choices and examine their likely implications for those served and those providing assistance and to explore creative strategies to improve policy implementation (service) outcomes. This work is undertaken in partnership with representatives of national, state and local governments as well as nonprofit organizations as necessary and appropriate.

SERVICES & RESEARCH

1994 – Current – Federal Reimbursement Unit (FRU)- Fairfax VA

The VTIPG Federal Reimbursement Unit has ongoing responsibilities to facilitate a collection of centralized processes to support the Fairfax County Department of Family Services (DFS). This includes the following:

  1. secure child support from non-custodial parents on behalf of children in foster care.
  2. to access federal funds on behalf of the children in foster care
  3. to pursue Medicaid funding for all Children’s Services Act (CSA) funded youth placed out of their homes
  4. to ensure compliance with CSA requirements to secure state matching funds
  5. to assess Parental Contributions
  6. do CSA case file reviews, CANS reports, distribution of reports, perform related training and other related CSA duties.

The FRU reviews records of children in foster care placement with the County and supports the process for reimbursements for those children. The reimbursement of local expenditures via federal funds reduces the local costs of providing services to children in foster care (expended through the CSA).

Our goals:

  • Continue to refine the process so that, where possible, fewer County tax dollars will be spent to support children who are in foster care placement and children in receipt of CSA pool funds and more will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children
  • Access funds for reimbursement, based upon each child’s eligibility,
    • include Title II and XVI—Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits, Survivors’ Benefits (SSA)
    • Title XIX – Medicaid benefits
    • Title IV-D – Child Support
    • CSA Parental Contributions
  • Contractor will recover the maximum allowable amount of federal/state reimbursements.

Why Access These Resources?

  • Fewer County tax dollars will be spent to support children who are in foster care placement and children in receipt of CSA pool funds and more will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children

Who Are Our Stakeholders?

Fairfax County Department of Family Services, Child Protective Services and Foster Care and Adoptions Program

FRU Contact Information:

Questions? Comments? Please contact:

Melony A. Price-Rhodes, PhD
Senior Program Director, National Capital Region,
Virginia Tech, School of Public and International Affairs, Institute for Policy and Governance Principal Investigator and Project Director, Federal Reimbursement Unit
12011 Government Center Parkway Ste. 620
Fairfax, VA 22035

Email: mpricerh@vt.edu
Phone: 703.324.7309

RESEARCH & OUTREACH


AmeriCorps Reading Hour Program 2014 – 2017

About the Program:

The VT AmeriCorps Reading Hour is a literacy and mentoring program in which adult volunteers from the community and local businesses travel to a nearby child care center once a week or once every other week, and read one-on-one to a student. The volunteer spends 30 minutes reading and interacting with their Reading Friend. 

Reading Hour aims to increase children’s prospects for success in school and in life via reading experiences with caring adults. Through our Reading Hour program, we reach children while they are young, stimulate their interest in reading and learning, and encourage them to believe that they, too, can be successful.

Our goals:

  • To generate enthusiasm for books and reading.
  • To improve children’s listening comprehension, vocabulary, ability to articulate thoughts, and background knowledge (fundamental literacy skills).
  • To increase children’s self-esteem through consistent weekly attention from their mentors.
  • To provide flexible, convenient volunteer experiences for area professionals.
  • To bring community support and resources into local childcare centers and expose children to people of diverse cultures and backgrounds.

Why Read Aloud to Children?

“The single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading is reading aloud to children.”

–National Commission on Reading, Becoming a Nation of Readers Report, 1985

In response to the National Commission on Reading’s landmark 1985 report, Becoming a Nation of Readers, and other such studies Smart Beginnings NRV has created the Reading Hour, a program in which adult volunteers are matched, one-to-one, with children to read aloud to them at their daycare center. Read aloud, by definition, involves an adult reading out loud to a child or children in order to foster a love of reading and to expose the child/children to a variety of vocabulary, language patterns, story structures, genres and authors. When read to, children are exposed to more complex language and vocabulary than they encounter in their own reading and as a result their reading skills improve.

What are Corporate Partners?

Corporate Partners provide Smart Beginnings New River Valley with both volunteers and support. SBNRV in turn manages the Reading Hour, taking full responsibility for program coordination. Employee volunteers of our corporate partners enjoy a rewarding community service experience, miss little or no work time, and feel excited to be part of a company that supports their involvement in the local community.

Reading Hour Contact Information:

Questions? Comments? Interested in volunteering or becoming a corporate partner? Want to get your daycare center involved? Please contact:

David Moore
Smart Beginnings New River Valley
201 W. Roanoke St. (0489), Blacksburg, VA 24061
Email: sbnrvreadinghour@gmail.com
Phone: 540-553-1454

Partnership in Self-Sufficiency 2000 – 2012

Guided by Mary Beth Dunkenberger and Holly Lesko, VTIPG and five Local Departments of Social Services (LDSS) in the New River Valley, collectively known as the Partners for Self-Sufficiency (PSS), provides wrap around services to address Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) clients’ employment barriers and service needs in an individualized manner. The existing partnership expands and engages the existing community networks of both employers and human service providers with an emphasis on intensive vocational case management through referral to Vocational Specialists in each of the five New River Valley jurisdictions.

The overarching goal of our regional employment placement, retention, and advancement model is to expedite preparation of Virginia Initiative for Employment Not Welfare (VIEW) participants for entry-level positions with employers who offer benefit packages, greater job security, and some potential for upgrading skills and to provide a strong focus on job retention. In addition to employment-based services, the PSS program focuses on other barriers clients face in life that influences job readiness and retention.  Specific research and programmatic efforts have been directed to assess needs and services in areas such as domestic violence, mental illness, disability assessments, and multi-generational poverty prevention efforts.

The services provided are 1) the integration of our intensive job readiness program, job development activities, and concentrated vocational case management activities; 2) continued development and refinement of community resources that facilitate employment of TANF recipients; 3) an SSI/SSDI application support service that helps local agencies better evaluate disabled TANF recipients and helps provide access to additional resources to assist them; and 4) focused job retention efforts coordinated with employers. The PSS program has been operating in the region for over ten years and has served over 5,000 clients across the region during that tenure.

Virginia Department of Health (VDH) Women, Infants and Children’s Special Supplement Nutrition Program (WIC) 2011

VTIPG assisted the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) in assessing the strengths, weaknesses and gaps in utilization of the Women, Infants and Children’s Special Supplemental Nutrition (WIC) Program among foster care parents of eligible children and young women. This project also developed outreach strategies to expand the utilization of the WIC program among foster care families and children. The final report may be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

VSQI Pilot Evaluation (Family Child Care Home Demonstration of the Virginia Star Quality Initiative Evaluation Report) 2011

VTIPG faculty collaborated with the Virginia Tech Child Development Center for Learning & Research to conduct a process evaluation of the Virginia Star Quality Initiative (VSQI) pilot project.  The pilot initiative established a child care quality rating, mentoring and improvement system for the Commonwealth’s home based child care providers.   Researchers at Virginia Tech were selected to conduct an evaluation of the draft home-based provider Standards, a process evaluation of the pilot program, and to suggest future directions for ensuring the long-term feasibility, quality and sustainability of extending VSQI to family child care providers. Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Hope Co-Location (Co-location of Health Care Services with HOPE, Inc. An Assessment of Options) 2011

VTIPG and the Virginia Tech Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE) have conducted an assessment of several options for HOPE, Inc. (HOPE) to co-locate health care services along with other HOPE service providers. The evaluation has appraised the appropriateness and viability of two distinct care providers – The Brock Hughes Free Clinic (BHFC) and the Bland County Medical Clinic to co-locate health services with HOPE to serve low income individuals and families. This assessment builds on previous health needs assessments conducted in the Wythe-Bland region but specifically focuses on the viable options for the use of the HOPE, Inc. office space. Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Responsible Rides Program Evaluation 2011

VTIPG conducted  an evaluation overview of the impact of the Responsible Rides program for participants in the first year of the program. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify the short-term impacts of the program and provide insight into potential changes necessary for continued program success.  The evaluation was structured to identify key employment and income as well as personal impacts of car ownership.  To a limited extent the evaluation also assessed the strengths and weaknesses of the process utilized to engage participants in the program.  Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Virginia Rural Health Association Policy Brief (Veteran’s Health Care in Rural Virginia) 2011

VTIPG collaborated with the Virginia Rural Health Association’s (VRHA) to develop issues brief on the status and needs related to veterans’ health.  The issue brief and supplements are available at http://www.vrha.org/legislation_policy.php

Virginia Wounded Warrior Program Needs and Gaps Assessment 2010

VTIPG faculty and graduate students collaborated with the Virginia Tech Center for Survey Research and the Virginia Tech Center for Geospatial Information Technology to conduct a comprehensive study of veteran’s needs, experiences and service gaps in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The study was commissioned by the Virginia Wounded Warrior Program, which has been charged with coordinating and facilitating the services that are needed by Virginia’s veterans who have served in the United States military, particularly those who have served in the Gulf War conflicts.  The research has been utilized to inform policy and program development for the Virginia Department of Veteran Services and the VWWP. The final report may be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Generations United Report: Intergenerational Shared Sites Save Money

Funded by a grant from MetLife Foundation, Dr. Shannon Jarrott from Virginia Tech’s Department for Human Development and Dr. Aaron Schroeder and Owen Perkins from VTIPG completed an exploratory study for Generations United which shows that intergenerational shared site programs can save money through sharing expenses.  These findings are a result of the first national analysis of cost-savings in intergenerational shared site programs.

Generations United (GU) is the national membership organization focused solely on improving the lives of children, youth, and older people through intergenerational strategies, programs, and public policies. GU represents more than 100 national, state, and local organizations and individuals representing more than 70 million Americans. Since 1986 GU has served as a resource for educating policymakers and the public about the economic, social, and personal imperatives of intergenerational cooperation. GU acts as a catalyst for stimulating collaboration between aging, children, and youth organizations, providing a forum to explore areas of common ground while celebrating the richness of each generation.

For more on Generations United visit www.gu.org/. For the full report Intergenerational Shared Sites: Saving Dollars While Making Sense, click here.

Evaluation of Virginia’s Child Protective Services Program

In 2008, under the principal investigation of Dr. Renee Loeffler, VTIPG conducted an evaluation of Virginia’s child protective services program under a contract with the Virginia Department of Social Services.  This work was a continuation of a multi-year project to assess the effects of the Differential Response System, a new approach to child protection adopted by the state in 2002.

VTIPG used statewide data on all child protective services cases in 2007 to assess outcomes and to analyze trends in key program variables.  A topic for special study in 2008 was the activities of Virginia’s local departments of social services in providing services to families to treat or prevent child abuse or neglect.  This project culminated in a report to the 2009 General Assembly.

VTIPG provided a separate report to each of Virginia’s 120 local departments of social services.  The local agency reports include local, regional and state data for key CPS program variables so that each local department can compare itself to regional neighbors and the state as a whole.

SSI Advocacy for Employment Options (SAFE) 2006 – 2009

Mary Beth Dunkenberger and Nancy White led the SSI Advocacy for Employment Options (SAFE) initiative to develop and deliver a training and technical assistance model for disability assessment and SSI advocacy for the TANF and VIEW programs.  The training and technical assistance was delivered to local departments of social services (LDSS) staff throughout the Commonwealth by Hazel B. Smith, program expert, and Nancy White.

This program focused on the identification and assessment of disabilities in persons participating in the TANF program with an emphasis on the Social Security Administration (SSA) definition of disability as related to Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).  Building this capacity will enable LDSS staff in the assessment process to determine if persons with disabilities may be served with accommodations in moving toward employment or if the disability appears so severe that a referral to the SSI program would be more appropriate.

The determination of a disability by LDSS staff as early in the assessment process as possible allows for a more efficient use of time sensitive recourses and will enable LDSS staff to inform TANF participants of the procedures, policies, and timeframes related to SSA determination of disability.  Local agencies will be able to structure a disability program that best meets the unique needs of the locality and participant population. The ultimate goal is that after the initial collaborative period, LDSS will have the capacity and organizational knowledge to assess TANF participant disabilities and provide ongoing SSI Advocacy services to TANF and VIEW participants as appropriate under policy and to meet the needs of the participant.

Fairfax County Federal Reimbursement Unit (FRU)

The FRU has ongoing responsibilities to facilitate the collection of centralized processes to secure child support from non-custodial parents on behalf of the children in foster care, to access Federal funds on behalf of children in foster care, and to pursue Medicaid funding for certain Medicaid eligible services for CSA funded youth placed out of their homes.

Under the guidance of Melony Price-Rhodes, the FRU reviews records of children in foster care and supports the process for reimbursements for those children. The reimbursement of local expenditures via federal funds reduces the local costs (expended by the Department of Family Services and through the Comprehensive Services Act (CSA)) of providing services to children in foster care.

The FRU continues to refine the process so that, where possible, fewer County tax dollars are spent to support children who are in foster care and in receipt of CSA pool funds.  More funds will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children.  Funds accessed for reimbursement, based upon each child’s eligibility, include Title IV-E, Title II and XVI – Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits, Survivors’ Benefits (SSA), Title XIX – Medicaid benefits and Title IV-D – Child Support.

Loudoun County, VA Comprehensive Services Act Program

Melony Price-Rhodes, Project Associate at VTIPG facilitated case reviews of foster care children in Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of identifying a group of funds for 70 to 100 foster care cases for children that are in foster care in Loudoun County, Virginia. The groups of funds include, Title IV-E, Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Benefits and Child Support. The case reviews will assess the efficacy of the current efforts by Loudoun County staff to maximize revenues for children in foster care.

Child and Family Services Review (FY 2005 – FY 2007)

VTIPG contracted with VDSS to conduct a two year program improvement plan for the Child and Family Services Review. IPG deployed a nine member team that included two graduate research assistants to review approximately 1700 foster care and child protective services cases. The results of each case review were included in an agency specific report with recommendations for each locality which was assembled into a statewide assessment of the aggregate data to meet 14 federally mandated performance goals.

Federal Reimbursement Unit Technical Assistance Team (FRU-TAT) 2001-2007

The Federal Resource Utilization Technical Assistance Team (FRU-TAT) created in 2001 under contract with The Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) and the Institute for Policy Outreach (IPO) had four active and distinct components – 1) Title IV-E review and program improvement; 2) SSI research and advocacy for Foster Care and TANF populations; 3) development of Automated Eligibility System; and 4) adoption subsidy analysis and review.

The FRU (2005-2007) provided quality assurance to VDSS in preparation for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) secondary review of Virginia’s Title IV-E foster care program conducted in March 2007.  On-site reviews of LDSS Title IV-E foster care case records selected by VDSS were conducted by the FRU during Phases I, II, and III by reviewing a total of 5,357 cases to ensure that cases identified as title IV-E eligible in OASIS met federal statutory eligibility requirements for foster care maintenance payments. The Specialists conducted payment record reviews on a pre-selected number of Title IV-E cases during the on-site reviews. They also conducted a financial records desk review of one Title IV-E case from each LDSS that reported a title IV-E payment case type in OASIS immediately prior to the secondary review. The financial reviews determined if title IV-E eligible cases were appropriately utilizing federal financial reimbursement.  The specialist served as regional consultants in the area of Title IV-E eligibility and in that capacity provided case consultation, monitoring, training, and technical assistance to LDSS on an as needed basis. At the conclusion of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) secondary review of Virginia’s Title IV-E foster care program, the Commonwealth of Virginia was considered to be in substantial compliance.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) efforts were focused on reviewing foster care records and making application for SSI on behalf of foster care children with identified disabilities.  A SSI-TANF effort was launched in Virginia Beach with a team member permanently stationed at Virginia Beach DSS to review and make applications for adults with disabilities who are currently participating in the VIEW program. At the conclusion of the project the team had an 85% application approval rate.

CURRICULUM

One of VTIPG’s responsibilities is to work with the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) and its academic programs to develop and propose nonprofit and nongovernmental organization related curricula at the undergraduate and graduate levels including concentrations, graduate certificates and potentially a freestanding graduate degree program in Nonprofit/ Nongovernmental Organization Management. Irrespective of specific content, the nonprofit/nongovernmental offerings share a number of characteristics, such as interdisciplinary faculty, a comparative focus, and integration of theory, practice and public policy implications.

Degree Concentrations

The concentration in public and nonprofit management in SPIA offers interested students the opportunity to study, in depth, public and nonprofit organization management tools, techniques, processes and policy contexts. Students may also pursue an additional focus in budgeting and financial management.

Doctoral Program

Students who wish to continue their studies in public and nonprofit management can matriculate into the inter-disciplinary doctoral program in Planning, Governance and Globalization (PGG). The program provides students with the flexibility to design a course of study that best meets their interests. Students in this PGG stream have engaged in research related to strategic planning processes in localities, health care in Africa, evaluation of long-term care, social class and migration, self-help housing and risk assessment.

Graduate Certificates

The School of Public and International Affairs currently offers a 12 hour certificate in Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organization Management. There is an online certificate option that includes many of the nonprofit courses and can be completed completely online.  See the Certificate Overview in the Virginia Tech Graduate Catalog for additional information.

How to Apply

Virginia Tech graduate students who are currently enrolled and working toward a degree should use the following to apply for entrance into the graduate certificate program in Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organization Management (NNMC). Individuals interest in enrolling in Virginia Tech and pursuing the graduate certificate should apply online at the Virginia Tech Graduate School website. The form can be found here.

AFFILIATED COURSES


UAP 5084G – Advanced Community Involvement 
Issues, concepts, and techniques of citizen participation in community development and planning. Theoretical foundation, instituational frameworks, and historical evolution of participatory democracy. Exercises developing group communication skills, public meeting facilitation, and design of community involvement programs. Pre-requisite: Graduate Standing Required
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5454 – Nonprofit Organization & Management 
Examines the nonprofit sector in American society and compares those roles with the roles the sector plays in other advanced democracies as well as in developing countries. Also analyzes the role of important sub sectors within the nation’s third sector and explores key management challenges confronting non-profit organization leaders with them. Compares those challenges to those found in nongovernmental organizations in developing nations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Undergraduate, Graduate

UAP 5534 – Nonprofit Organization Leadership and Governance 
Major conceptual issues related to developing an understanding of the foundations and roles of leadership and governance of third sector and nongovernmental organizations. Comparison of nongovernmental organizations in the U.S. and around the world. The course is designed to equip students with the capacities to assess and improve organizational governance effectiveness as well as to devise and implement leadership strategies in the complex structural, social and political contexts in which these organizations are typically enmeshed in the United States as well as in other industrialized democracies and in developing nations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Undergraduate, Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5034 – Democratic Governance in the Economy 
An international and comparative examination of workplace and economic relations around the world, with special focus on efforts to build collaborative work processes that would extend the voice, ownership and control rights of workers. The interface between state institutions and economic organizations is also considered, especially insofar as government prescriptions and processes that may impede or extend democratic governance of the economy. Graduate Standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA 5154 – Global Accountabilities
Provides a comparative perspective on “accountability” among nonprofit and non-governmental organizations, private corporations, governmental organizations, and inter-governmental organizations. Theories and practices of accountability, reporting, monitoring, compliance and learning are considered.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PSCI 5164 – Collaborative Governance and Civil Society 
Theoretical foundations of collaborative policy and governance approaches are examined. Strategies and methods for forming and sustaining collaborative coalitions are discussed. Case studies are used to illustrate the effectiveness of collaborative approaches in different policy domains. I
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA 5274 – Comparative Social Movements
This course will investigate the forms of public protest that occur all over the world, with special attention to activism in poor nations and to the recent emergence of transnational movements. Also examines why and when governments repress social movements. Explores movements that are grounded in collective identities based in class, race/ethnicity, gender, religion, and culture. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5354 – Charity, Philanthropy and Civil Society 
This course treats the evolution of philanthropy and charity in the United States and abroad and introduces major issues and continuing concerns linked to the institutiuons engaged in these activities while exploring their ties to civil society. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate
Instruction Type: Lecture

UAP 5364 – Non-Governmental Organizations in International Development 
Explores theory and cases of non-governmental organizations in international development. Analyzes various roles of NGOs, and their interactions with local communities, government agencies, international organizations, and private businesses. Examines tensions and collaborations between NGOs and other development actors, drawing from cases in environmental, health, and educational policy domains. II.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5444 – Strategic Planning and Management 
An examination of different processes and procedures for generic planning and management of a strategic nature. Particular emphasis on analytical techniques, especially Artificial Intelligence, that are used in the process.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5474 – Program Evaluation
Conceptual approaches and methodological techniques for evaluating national, regional, and local human services programs. Examination of issues relevant to the function of evaluation research and the role of evaluators.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5514 – Public Budgeting and Management 
Examines public budgeting and management theories, concepts, policies, processes, and practices, and their effects on federal, state, and local governments. Theoretical aspects of budgeting and management control are related to practical budgeting issues and exercises. Attention is also given to the internal management of the budgeting function.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PAPA 5544 – Public and Nonprofit Financial Management 
Examines concepts central to effective financial management of public and non-profit organizations. Affords students an opportunity to further their understanding of the relationship between financial accounting and reporting systems and effective organization management. II
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5564 – Information Technology, Society, and Public Policy 
Social impacts of new and emerging information technologies from a public policy perspective. Technical nature of IT and influences of IT on four core dimensions of society: political, economic, cultural, and spatial. Course integrates theoretical and philosophical literature on IT with applied policy and planning issues.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PSCI 5574 – Arts, Culture and Society
Considers the role of the arts in society, including architecture, music companies, or theater productions to heritage sites, science museums, and art galleries. Effective arts policy in revitalizing urban economies also examined. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5594 – Nonprofit Law and Ethics
Explores the legal, ethical and normative systems affecting nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations, both domestically and internationally. Examines the historical foundations of legal regulation and professional ethics within the sector and how these systems contribute to the administration and governance of nonprofit and nongovernamental organizations. Also surveys current theories of nonprofit/nongovernmental organization regulation as well as major legal and ethical issues confronting the sector. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PAPA 5694 – Asset Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations 
Provides an understanding of asset management for governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental entities. Focuses on the essentials of cash budgeting and cash management, investment of endowments and pension funds, and debt management and debt financing for governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5974 – Independent Study
Credit Hours: 1 to 19
Lecture Hours: 1 to 19
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5984 – Special Study
Credit Hours: 1 to 19
Lecture Hours: 1 to 10
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 5674 – Financial Health of Public and Nonprofit Organizations 
Concepts and analytical capacities necessary to evaluate the overall level of financial health of governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations. Examines the tools and techniques necessary to assess the financial condition of the organizations and to determie if they have the capacity to carry out their purposes and address their debt obligations. Graduate Standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6114 – Complex Public Organizations
Examines the principal conceptual and theoretical bases for understanding the structure and environment of complex public organizations; also explores the problems bureaucracy poses for democratic theory and for vigorous economy.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6124 – Behavior and Change in Public Organizations 
Dynamics of behavior and change process in public sector organizations are examined for: (1) their implications for individuals, groups, and society; and (2) their impact upon organizational productivity and public policy. Critical dimensions of leadership as a sociopsychological process in management are emphasized with special reference to the public sector and public executives. The course also surveys the various types and strategies for planned change in public sector organizations.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6324 – Public Personnel Processes and Their Policy Implications 
Surveys the key personnel processes of public organizations, the contrasting norms and behaviors of participants, their impacts on policy, and their implications for democracy.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA 5004 – Power and Policy in the U.S.
Social science theory and research on the distribution of power in the US, especially as it shapes important national policy outcomes. Institutional and class bases of power will be examined, including membership on corporate boards and in policy-shaping think tanks. Implications for democracy in society will be drawn. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA 5004 – Community Involvement
Social science theory and research on the distribution of power in the US, especially as it shapes important national policy outcomes. Institutional and class bases of power will be examined, including membership on corporate boards and in policy-shaping think tanks. Implications for democracy in society will be drawn. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5454 – Advanced Topics in Information Technology & Public Policy 
In-depth study and critical evaluation of selected complex issues related to information technology, society, governance, and public policy. Focused attention is given to theoretical and methodological foundations of the area of inquiry and to specific domains of policymaking and implementation. Topics will be selected from IT-related issues in such areas of concern as: cities, local communities, nonprofit organizations, governments, and global networks. May be repeated on a different topic. Must meet prerequisite or have permission of instructor.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5554 – Culture, Politics and Society in Network Environments 
Historical origins, institutional foundations, and theoretical interpretations of cultural, political, and social interaction through computer mediated communication are examined. Particular attention is given to new types of discourse, sources of power, and structures of society at all geographical levels in global computer and communications networks.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5554 – Democracy Begond the Ballot 
Forms of ultra or enhanced democracy outside of state institutions, particulary those developing in third sector organizations, theories of democracy and research on functioning deliberative democracies at the grassroots level, in societal or international institutions. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 6224 – Competing Conceptions of the Third Sector
Competing Conceptions of the Third Sector Competing theories and conceptions of the third sector in relation to the for-profit firm and the state with international perspectives on voluntary grassroots action challenges and societal transformation. Integration of theoretical and research literatures in the field. Graduate Standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

FACULTY



Max Stephenson, Jr.
IPG Director

Research Areas:

  • Nonprofit/NGO governance, leadership, management & civil society
  • Public policy & policy theory
  • Peacebuilding, international development & democratization
  • Environmental politics, policy & planning

Email | Read CV

Mary Beth Dunkenberger 
Senior Program Director & Business Manager, Blacksburg

Research Areas:

  • Connections between social programs, economic & community development
  • Organizational and program assessments
  • Policy and program innovations

Email | Read Bio

Melony Price-Rhodes, Ph. D. 
Senior Program Director, Alexandria

Research Areas:

  • Child welfare, revenue maximization, foster care and child protective services
  • Federal and state regulations affecting Federal Reimbursement Unit activities

Email | Photography Collection

David Moore
Senior Research Associate, Project Director (TAP) Swiftstart

Research Areas:

  • Nonprofit/NGO & governance, leadership, management & civil society
  • Public policy & policy theory
  • Early childhood & workforce development
  • Organizational development & capacity building

Email | Read Bio

Elizabeth Allen
Assistant Business Manager, Program Research Associate, Data Manager

Research Areas:

  • Develop and maintain data management for asset mapping/web portal prototype and gap analyses
  • Administer and report results of on-line survey instruments
  • Coordinate and co-facilitate focus groups/structured interviews
  • Report preparation and generate tables and charts for stakeholder meetings and project contractors

Email | Read Bio

Maya Berinzon
Research Associate

Research Areas:

  • Law & International Development
  • Comparative Law
  • Access to information
  • Regional focus in sub-Saharan Africa


Don Back
VTIPG Senior Fellow

Research Areas:

  • Higher Education Financing, Governance and Leadership
  • Higher Education Policy and Practice
  • Internationalization of Higher Education
  • International Development

Email | Bio

Andy Morikawa
VTIPG Senior Fellow

Email

Martha Mead
VTIPG Fellow

Email

Minnis Ridenour
VTIPG Fellow, Resource Development

Research Areas:

  • Resource development
  • Financial management for governmental & nonprofit organizations

Email | Read Bio

George Still
VTIPG Fellow

Research Areas:

  • Support IPG / Pursue Grants
  • Consultation
  • Assist with reports & articles for publication

Edward Weisband
VTIPG Fellow, Endowed Chair, Political Science

Research Areas:

  • International monitoring regimes
  • Global accountabilities
  • Core international labor standard

Email | Read Bio


Suzanne Lo
Project Associate

Marcy Schnitzer
Assistant Provost for Diversity and Strategic Planning

Katy Powell
Professor of English and Director of the Center for Rhetoric in Society

Nancy White
Senior Consultant

Research Areas:

  • Policy design
  • Administration
  • Nonprofit and nongovernmental organizational evaluations

Email | Read Bio

Lyusyena Kirakosyan
VTIPG Senior Project Associate

Email

Rachel Christensen
VTIPG Senior Project Associate

STAFF


Karen Boone
Financial Manager

Responsibilities:

  • Finances
  • Payroll – Wage
  • Travel
  • Human Resources
  • Reconciling
  • Facilities
  • Maintain Records

540-231-1118
Email

Regina Naff
Administrative Assistant

Responsibilities:

  • Administrative Assistant to the Director
  • Fixed Assets Manager
  • Web Content Coordinator
  • Editor of the IPG Quarterly Newsletter
  • Secondary assistance for miscellaneous office procedures

540-231-6775
Email

Wanda Mills
Web Content Administrator

Responsibilities:

  • Web Designer
  • Digital Content Management
  • IPG Website Administration

Email

Hazel Smith – Consulting Staff
Researcher

Responsibilities:

  • SSI Advocacy for Adults & Children

Email | Read Bio

Tanisha Capers
Project Specialist

Responsibilities:

  • Provides administrative and logistics support to the FRU management and staff
  • Human Resources Information System (HRIS) Banner representative
  • Assist with activities that secure initial and continued eligibility for children in receipt of CSA funds for other public assistance programs, specifically Title II (Social Security), Title IV-E, Title IV-D (Child Support), Title XVI (Supplemental Security Income)

Email

Vickie Grazioli
Data Entry Technician

Responsibilities:

  • Provides technical support to the FRU Medicaid Case Analyst in obtaining appropriate collateral information to evaluate initial and continuing eligibility for continuing Comprehensive Services (CSA) and Title XIX (Medicaid) eligibility for each child served by Fairfax County Comprehensive Services Act (CSA).

Email

Claudia Malenich
Court Specialist

Responsibilities:

  • Prepare and file Civil Petitions for Support at the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court
  • Perform all activities related to establishing Judicial Support Orders (JSOs) in juvenile court
  • Maintain accurate knowledge of relevant federal and state law, rules and regulations for Title IV-D funding

Email

Erin Mooney
Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Determine the initial eligibility of children in receipt of CSA funds for other public assistance programs, specifically Title II (Social Security), Title IV-E (AFDC-FC), Title IV-D (Child Support), Title XVI (Supplemental Security Income), and to maintain the child’s continuing eligibility
  • Comprehensive knowledge of complex federal and state laws governing public assistance programs
  • Ability to research, obtain, interpret, and integrate information from many sources
  • Thorough knowledge of physiological and mental health impairments. Expertise in assessing and evaluating functional limitations based on medical and/or mental health records

Email

Peter Flint
FRU CSA Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Process Comprehensive Services Act (CSA) copayment assessments for CSA supported agencies
  • Primary point of contact regarding the copayment process for CSA supported agencies
  • Research, analyze, and prepare statistics and information to assist the FRU Project Director with contract deliverables as necessary

Email

Brian Zamora
FRU CSA Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Analyze state uniform assessment instrument-the CANS document. Contact case manager if follow-up is required
  • Maintain accurate knowledge of relevant federal and state laws, local regulations, policies, and practices through reviews of publications, communications and training sessions with CSA and FRU management and staff
  • Research, analyze, and prepare statistics and information to assist the Project Director with contract deliverables as necessary. Provide Project Director and relevant CSA management and staff (as requested) with data and assistance as necessary for projects

Email

AFFILIATED STUDENTS


Master’s Students

Henry Ayakwah (MURP)
Leeann Budzevski (MURP)
Erin Burcham (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Nathan Corso (MPIA-MIP)
Dinah Girma (MURP)
Beth Olberding (MURP/MNR-MIP)
Lara Nagle (MURP)

Ph.D. Students

  Carmen Boggs-Parker (PGG)
Lindy Cranwell (PGG)
Mary Beth Dunkenberger (PAPA)
Jeremy Elliott-Engel (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Rachel Gabriele (PGG)
Benjamin Grove (PGG)
Vanessa Guerra (PGG)
Sarah Hanks (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Jake Keyel (PGG)
Kyunghee Kim (Arch.and Design)
Kristin Kirk (PGG)
Sarah Lyon-Hill (PGG)
Lorien MacAuley (Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education)
Neda Moayerian (PGG)
Cheryl Montgomery (PGG)
David Moore (PAPA)
Oladayo Omosa (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Hamza Safouane (PGG)
Danny White (PGG)

Research PhD Students

 Laura Nelson – PhD (Human Development)

Visiting PhD Students

Yunyun Chen
Chunxue Mu

Congratulations the following VTIPG Affiliated Students who recently obtained their master’s:

Kaitlyn Fitzgerald (MPIA), May 2017
Kristin Haas (MPIA), May 2017
Heather Lyne (MPIA) May 2017
Natalie Patterson (MURP), May 2017

Congratulations the following VTIPG Affiliated Students who recently obtained their Ph.D.:

 Lorien MacAuley (Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education), Dec 2017

AFFILIATIONS, PARTNERS, & SPONSORS


Government Organizations
United States Forest Service
National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement, DHHS
United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Services
Virginia Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services
Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development
Virginia Department of Social Services
Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles
Council on Virginia’s Future
Fairfax County Department of Social Services
Pulaski County Department of Social Services
Giles County Department of Social Services
Montgomery County Department of Social Services
Floyd County Department of Social Services
Dinwiddie County Department of Social Services
Radford City Department of Social Services
New River Valley Planning District Commission
Arlington Economic Development
Fairfax County-Northern Virginia Nonprofit Partnership
Virginia Department of Veterans Services
Virginia Center for Innovative Technology

Nonprofit Organizations
The Women’s Resource Center of the New River Valley
Carpenter’s Shelter for Homeless Children, Families and Adults
United Way of Henry County and Martinsville
New River Community Action
Generations United
Virginia Community Healthcare Association
Jefferson Center in Roanoke
Free Clinic of Franklin County
Rockbridge County Free Clinic
Southwest Virginia Second Harvest Food Bank
Brain Injury Services of Southwest Virginia, Inc.
Mental Health America of Roanoke Valley
Rescue Mission – Roanoke Valley

Foundations
Community Foundation of the New River Valley
Bertlessman Foundation
Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Carilion Foundation
Roanoke Times Landmark Communications Foundation
Ford Foundation
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
W. K. Kellogg Foundation

Centers and Institutes 
Institute for Society, Culture, and the Environment
The Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention
Virginia Bioinformatics Institute
World Disaster Risk Management Institute
Center for Gerontology
Virginia Tech Southwest Center
Virginia Tech Hampton Roads Center
Metropolitan Institute
Community Design Assistance Center
Southern Virginia Higher Education Center
Virginia Rural Health Association

DIRECTIONS

NOTICE

Parking at IPG is now under University Policy

To reach the campus from Interstate 81 (southbound and northbound):

  1. From Interstate 81, take Exit 118 to reach the exit ramps for all three of the exits at this location. There is only one exit ramp serving the exits; missing the ramp means a trip north to Exit 128 or south to Exit 114 to turn around.
  2. Take Exit 118B onto U.S. 460 West. This exit connects directly to the Christiansburg Bypass. Follow the signs for Blacksburg/Virginia Tech. The U.S. 460 bypass between Blacksburg and Christiansburg is a limited-access highway from 1-81 to the campus entrance at Southgate Drive.
  3. Watch signs carefully for routes and directions. From the bypass, Bus. U.S. 460 — South Main Street, exits to the right (take South Main Street as one route to reach downtown Blacksburg).
  4. Keep left and stay on U.S. 460 West, signed for “Virginia Tech, Bluefield” to continue directly to the university.
  5. Drive for 2.5 miles on U.S. 460 to the traffic light at VA 314, Southgate Drive. Turn right onto Southgate Drive. There is a campus map a quarter-mile on the right and the Visitor Information Center is a half-mile from U.S. 460 on the right.
  6. Continue to the stoplight at Spring Road and turn left onto Spring.
  7. Continue past Lane Stadium and Cassell Coliseum to the stop sign at Washington Street and turn right onto Washington.
  8. Continue through the stop sign at Kent Street and take the first left after the stop sign onto Otey Street.
  9. Continue past Wall Street and at the bottom of the hill turn right onto Roanoke Street.
  10. We are the last house on the right (at the corner of Roanoke Street and Draper Road).

CONTACT US

Let VTIPG and Virginia Tech put theory and knowledge to work for you! If you are interested in collaborating with us, please contact us:

The Institute is located in Alexandria and Blacksburg, Virginia.

Regina Naff
Administrative Assistant
Institute for Policy & Governance
201 West Roanoke Street (0489)
Blacksburg, VA 24061
Office: (540) 231-6775
Fax: (540) 231-6722
E-mail: regina50@vt.edu


Dr. Melony Price-Rhodes
Senior Program Director
Institute for Policy & Governance
1021 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Office: (703) 324-7309
E-mail: mpricerh@vt.edu

For more information, please contact the Institute’s Director.

Dr. Max O. Stephenson, Jr.
201 West Roanoke St.
Blacksburg , VA 24061
Office: (540) 231-7340
E-mail: mstephen@vt.edu

NEWS

Second Volume of RE:Reflections and Explorations Now Published

Colleagues and friends, I am delighted to inform you that the second volume in the RE: Reflections and Explorations series has now been published. You may find an electronic version of this new book, edited by myself and Lyusyena Kirakosyan here: http://doi.org/10.21061/vtipg.re.v2.  We will be holding a reception to celebrate this occasion in early February and will send along notice of that event in due course. Meanwhile, Happy Holidays to you and yours from the Institute for Policy and Governance at Virginia Tech!

Best wishes, Max

Veterans in Society Conference – Call for Papers

The 4th Annual Veterans in Society Conference will be held on March 26-28, 2018 at the Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center, Roanoke, VA.

Proposals due January 6, 2017

Veterans, Globalized: Veterans and their Societies in International Perspective

The Conference takes issues raised by the First World War as its point of departure to encourage research and generate scholarly conversations across disciplines and eras that consider the interplay of veterans and their societies in transnational or international perspective. To that end, we foresee juxtaposing explicitly comparative work with scholarship that delves into specific national, cultural, or historical contexts.

For more information, here is the link for the conference:  http://www.cpe.vt.edu/vis/

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary (250th) has been posted!!

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted:  Fear and the Moral Imagination: The Oil and Water of Democratic Self-Governance.

Note to Readers: This essay marks a milestone, as it is the 250th Soundings—the column first appeared on January 17, 2010. Thank you to all who have encouraged me to write these commentaries and who have offered their comments, positive and negative, concerning my efforts. I am very much in your debt. The next Soundings will appear on January 8, 2018. Happy Holidays to all! MOS

Neda Moayerian passed her Prelim defense

We are happy to announce that Neda Moayerian passed her Prelim defense on Monday, November 27. She is ready to advance to the next stage of the PhD program, the Proposal Defense. Her Doctoral advisory committee members are: Kwame Harrison (Sociology), Nancy McGhee (Tourism and Hospitality Management), Laura Zanotti (Political Science) and chair, Max Stephenson (Professor of Public and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for Policy and Governance). Congratulations Neda and best wishes going forward! We know you will do well.

Advancing the Human Condition Symposium

Several SPIA colleagues are participating this week in The Advancing the Human Condition Symposium, an Initiative of  Beyond Boundaries and The Equity and Social Disparity in the Human Condition Strategic Growth Area, November 28 – 30th and held in the Inn at VT. Max Stephenson is a discussant for the November 28th session (from 3:30 to 5:00) on Story Making as Cultural Work: Exploring Ontological Politics and Social Change in Communities of Struggle. Christian Matheis will be a panel member for the session, Interrogating what is meant by “Advancing the Human Condition” at 10:30 on November 29th. Sara Mattingly-Jordan will be a discussant for the panel Ethics and Engineering at 1:00 on the 29th. David Bieri, Ralph Hall, Max Stephenson and Christian Matheis will all participate in the session, The Beloved Community Initiative: Advancing the Human Condition through Inclusive, Sustainable Economics, 2:00 on the 30th. This session is organized jointly by the Beloved Community Initiative and the Policy Strategic Growth Area. There are many panels and promising discussions throughout both days.  Click here for the link to the schedule of events.

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted!

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted:  Reflections on Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address at Thanksgiving.

 I am posting Max’s Soundings early because I will be out of town and will not have internet access most of the time.

Wishing you and yours a very Happy and Safe Thanksgiving.  Thank you for reading and enjoy!

Danny White Passes proposal defense

Danny White, PGG PhD candidate, passed his proposal defense on Monday, November 13, 2017.  The title of his dissertation is:  “Sport and Social Capital:  Perceptions of Civil Society Organizations in Kigali, Rwanda”.  His committee includes:  Chair, Max Stephenson (Director of IPG), David Kniola (Professor School of Education), John Dooley (CEO of Virginia Tech Foundation),and Jocelyn Widmer (Director for Online Degree Programs at U of Florida).  Congratulations Danny and best wishes as you progress through the next phase of your PhD work!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Trade Agreements and Democracyby Simone Franzi, (PGG PhD student).

Thank you for reading.

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Youth as a Social Construct, by Nada Berrada, PhD student, ASPECT.

Thank you for reading and enjoy!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Strategic Use of Media in Mobilizing – Khunti Diaries, by Pallavi Raonka, PhD candidate, Scoiology.

Thank you for reading and enjoy!

Email

Urban Affairs Association 48th Annual Conference

April 4-7, 2018 | Sheraton Toronto Centre Hotel | Toronto, CN
Abstract/Session Proposal Deadline:  October 1, 2017

Shaping Justice and Sustainability Within and Beyond the City’s Edge:
Contestation and Collaboration in Urbanizing Regions

In an era of globalizing forces, the region has become an important arena for collaboration and contestation, as metropolitan areas work to craft their individual identities. As they do so, questions of equity, inclusion, and sustainability remain. What is the role of diversity, difference and singularity of social actors and communities when it comes to forging visions of urban development that are collective in process, cohesive in vision and sustainable in implementation? Furthermore, as global financial systems exert greater control over national, regional, and local economies, what is the role of innovative and/or insurgent social practices in an urbanizing region? What are the most effective strategies to create environmentally and economically sustainable communities in a regional context? How will different factions of regional actors evolve given conventional relationships, increased social and cultural diversity, and the contradictions of competitiveness and solidarity?

Abstract/Proposal Deadline: UAA will not accept any proposals (of any kind) after October 1, 2017, 12 midnight Central Daylight Time (CDT) or 5:00am GMT. The online submission site will close at 12:01 am CDT.  Acceptance or rejection notices will be sent by November 30,2017.

Questions? Visit the UAA website: http://urbanaffairsassociation.org/conference/ (for info on proposal submissions, registration,hotel reservations,etc.), or contact us at mailto:conf@uaamail.orgor 1-414-229-3025.

APSA 2016 Annual Meeting

APSA 2016 Annual Meeting
September 1-4, 2016
Great Transformations: Political Science and the Big Questions of Our Time
Philadelphia, PA

Voluntary Action History Society 25th Anniversary Conference

Voluntary Action History Society 25th Anniversary Conference
July 13-15, 2016
Thinking about the Past; Thinking about the Future
University of Liverpool

October 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

July 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

From the Director: Tidings Quarterly Reflection:

The “Beloved Community:” Aspiring to be a Truly Free and Self-Governing Society

Opportunities

Call for Submissions (deadline September 15, 2017) The Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development is seeking submissions for publication in the Continue reading 

April 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

January 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

DIRECTOR’S CORNER

Child & Family Social Welfare Policy

Institute faculty and their partners are working in this domain to understand better the implications and dynamics of child protection, foster care placement and transfer payment policies, including Temporary Aid to Needy Families, Medicaid Title IVE funding and child care subsidy. More broadly, the Institute is active in this area to develop deeper knowledge of the tensions and assumptions that underpin current social policy design at all levels of American governance, to chart alternatives to existing choices and examine their likely implications for those served and those providing assistance and to explore creative strategies to improve policy implementation (service) outcomes. This work is undertaken in partnership with representatives of national, state and local governments as well as nonprofit organizations as necessary and appropriate.

SERVICES & RESEARCH

1994 – Current – Federal Reimbursement Unit (FRU)- Fairfax VA

The VTIPG Federal Reimbursement Unit has ongoing responsibilities to facilitate a collection of centralized processes to support the Fairfax County Department of Family Services (DFS). This includes the following:

  1. secure child support from non-custodial parents on behalf of children in foster care.
  2. to access federal funds on behalf of the children in foster care
  3. to pursue Medicaid funding for all Children’s Services Act (CSA) funded youth placed out of their homes
  4. to ensure compliance with CSA requirements to secure state matching funds
  5. to assess Parental Contributions
  6. do CSA case file reviews, CANS reports, distribution of reports, perform related training and other related CSA duties.

The FRU reviews records of children in foster care placement with the County and supports the process for reimbursements for those children. The reimbursement of local expenditures via federal funds reduces the local costs of providing services to children in foster care (expended through the CSA).

Our goals:

  • Continue to refine the process so that, where possible, fewer County tax dollars will be spent to support children who are in foster care placement and children in receipt of CSA pool funds and more will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children
  • Access funds for reimbursement, based upon each child’s eligibility,
    • include Title II and XVI—Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits, Survivors’ Benefits (SSA)
    • Title XIX – Medicaid benefits
    • Title IV-D – Child Support
    • CSA Parental Contributions
  • Contractor will recover the maximum allowable amount of federal/state reimbursements.

Why Access These Resources?

  • Fewer County tax dollars will be spent to support children who are in foster care placement and children in receipt of CSA pool funds and more will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children

Who Are Our Stakeholders?

Fairfax County Department of Family Services, Child Protective Services and Foster Care and Adoptions Program

FRU Contact Information:

Questions? Comments? Please contact:

Melony A. Price-Rhodes, PhD
Senior Program Director, National Capital Region,
Virginia Tech, School of Public and International Affairs, Institute for Policy and Governance Principal Investigator and Project Director, Federal Reimbursement Unit
12011 Government Center Parkway Ste. 620
Fairfax, VA 22035

Email: mpricerh@vt.edu
Phone: 703.324.7309

RESEARCH & OUTREACH


AmeriCorps Reading Hour Program 2014 – 2017

About the Program:

The VT AmeriCorps Reading Hour is a literacy and mentoring program in which adult volunteers from the community and local businesses travel to a nearby child care center once a week or once every other week, and read one-on-one to a student. The volunteer spends 30 minutes reading and interacting with their Reading Friend. 

Reading Hour aims to increase children’s prospects for success in school and in life via reading experiences with caring adults. Through our Reading Hour program, we reach children while they are young, stimulate their interest in reading and learning, and encourage them to believe that they, too, can be successful.

Our goals:

  • To generate enthusiasm for books and reading.
  • To improve children’s listening comprehension, vocabulary, ability to articulate thoughts, and background knowledge (fundamental literacy skills).
  • To increase children’s self-esteem through consistent weekly attention from their mentors.
  • To provide flexible, convenient volunteer experiences for area professionals.
  • To bring community support and resources into local childcare centers and expose children to people of diverse cultures and backgrounds.

Why Read Aloud to Children?

“The single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading is reading aloud to children.”

–National Commission on Reading, Becoming a Nation of Readers Report, 1985

In response to the National Commission on Reading’s landmark 1985 report, Becoming a Nation of Readers, and other such studies Smart Beginnings NRV has created the Reading Hour, a program in which adult volunteers are matched, one-to-one, with children to read aloud to them at their daycare center. Read aloud, by definition, involves an adult reading out loud to a child or children in order to foster a love of reading and to expose the child/children to a variety of vocabulary, language patterns, story structures, genres and authors. When read to, children are exposed to more complex language and vocabulary than they encounter in their own reading and as a result their reading skills improve.

What are Corporate Partners?

Corporate Partners provide Smart Beginnings New River Valley with both volunteers and support. SBNRV in turn manages the Reading Hour, taking full responsibility for program coordination. Employee volunteers of our corporate partners enjoy a rewarding community service experience, miss little or no work time, and feel excited to be part of a company that supports their involvement in the local community.

Reading Hour Contact Information:

Questions? Comments? Interested in volunteering or becoming a corporate partner? Want to get your daycare center involved? Please contact:

David Moore
Smart Beginnings New River Valley
201 W. Roanoke St. (0489), Blacksburg, VA 24061
Email: sbnrvreadinghour@gmail.com
Phone: 540-553-1454

Partnership in Self-Sufficiency 2000 – 2012

Guided by Mary Beth Dunkenberger and Holly Lesko, VTIPG and five Local Departments of Social Services (LDSS) in the New River Valley, collectively known as the Partners for Self-Sufficiency (PSS), provides wrap around services to address Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) clients’ employment barriers and service needs in an individualized manner. The existing partnership expands and engages the existing community networks of both employers and human service providers with an emphasis on intensive vocational case management through referral to Vocational Specialists in each of the five New River Valley jurisdictions.

The overarching goal of our regional employment placement, retention, and advancement model is to expedite preparation of Virginia Initiative for Employment Not Welfare (VIEW) participants for entry-level positions with employers who offer benefit packages, greater job security, and some potential for upgrading skills and to provide a strong focus on job retention. In addition to employment-based services, the PSS program focuses on other barriers clients face in life that influences job readiness and retention.  Specific research and programmatic efforts have been directed to assess needs and services in areas such as domestic violence, mental illness, disability assessments, and multi-generational poverty prevention efforts.

The services provided are 1) the integration of our intensive job readiness program, job development activities, and concentrated vocational case management activities; 2) continued development and refinement of community resources that facilitate employment of TANF recipients; 3) an SSI/SSDI application support service that helps local agencies better evaluate disabled TANF recipients and helps provide access to additional resources to assist them; and 4) focused job retention efforts coordinated with employers. The PSS program has been operating in the region for over ten years and has served over 5,000 clients across the region during that tenure.

Virginia Department of Health (VDH) Women, Infants and Children’s Special Supplement Nutrition Program (WIC) 2011

VTIPG assisted the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) in assessing the strengths, weaknesses and gaps in utilization of the Women, Infants and Children’s Special Supplemental Nutrition (WIC) Program among foster care parents of eligible children and young women. This project also developed outreach strategies to expand the utilization of the WIC program among foster care families and children. The final report may be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

VSQI Pilot Evaluation (Family Child Care Home Demonstration of the Virginia Star Quality Initiative Evaluation Report) 2011

VTIPG faculty collaborated with the Virginia Tech Child Development Center for Learning & Research to conduct a process evaluation of the Virginia Star Quality Initiative (VSQI) pilot project.  The pilot initiative established a child care quality rating, mentoring and improvement system for the Commonwealth’s home based child care providers.   Researchers at Virginia Tech were selected to conduct an evaluation of the draft home-based provider Standards, a process evaluation of the pilot program, and to suggest future directions for ensuring the long-term feasibility, quality and sustainability of extending VSQI to family child care providers. Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Hope Co-Location (Co-location of Health Care Services with HOPE, Inc. An Assessment of Options) 2011

VTIPG and the Virginia Tech Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE) have conducted an assessment of several options for HOPE, Inc. (HOPE) to co-locate health care services along with other HOPE service providers. The evaluation has appraised the appropriateness and viability of two distinct care providers – The Brock Hughes Free Clinic (BHFC) and the Bland County Medical Clinic to co-locate health services with HOPE to serve low income individuals and families. This assessment builds on previous health needs assessments conducted in the Wythe-Bland region but specifically focuses on the viable options for the use of the HOPE, Inc. office space. Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Responsible Rides Program Evaluation 2011

VTIPG conducted  an evaluation overview of the impact of the Responsible Rides program for participants in the first year of the program. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify the short-term impacts of the program and provide insight into potential changes necessary for continued program success.  The evaluation was structured to identify key employment and income as well as personal impacts of car ownership.  To a limited extent the evaluation also assessed the strengths and weaknesses of the process utilized to engage participants in the program.  Additional information on the evaluation can be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Virginia Rural Health Association Policy Brief (Veteran’s Health Care in Rural Virginia) 2011

VTIPG collaborated with the Virginia Rural Health Association’s (VRHA) to develop issues brief on the status and needs related to veterans’ health.  The issue brief and supplements are available at http://www.vrha.org/legislation_policy.php

Virginia Wounded Warrior Program Needs and Gaps Assessment 2010

VTIPG faculty and graduate students collaborated with the Virginia Tech Center for Survey Research and the Virginia Tech Center for Geospatial Information Technology to conduct a comprehensive study of veteran’s needs, experiences and service gaps in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The study was commissioned by the Virginia Wounded Warrior Program, which has been charged with coordinating and facilitating the services that are needed by Virginia’s veterans who have served in the United States military, particularly those who have served in the Gulf War conflicts.  The research has been utilized to inform policy and program development for the Virginia Department of Veteran Services and the VWWP. The final report may be made available upon request to Mary Beth Dunkenberger, Principal Investigator.

Generations United Report: Intergenerational Shared Sites Save Money

Funded by a grant from MetLife Foundation, Dr. Shannon Jarrott from Virginia Tech’s Department for Human Development and Dr. Aaron Schroeder and Owen Perkins from VTIPG completed an exploratory study for Generations United which shows that intergenerational shared site programs can save money through sharing expenses.  These findings are a result of the first national analysis of cost-savings in intergenerational shared site programs.

Generations United (GU) is the national membership organization focused solely on improving the lives of children, youth, and older people through intergenerational strategies, programs, and public policies. GU represents more than 100 national, state, and local organizations and individuals representing more than 70 million Americans. Since 1986 GU has served as a resource for educating policymakers and the public about the economic, social, and personal imperatives of intergenerational cooperation. GU acts as a catalyst for stimulating collaboration between aging, children, and youth organizations, providing a forum to explore areas of common ground while celebrating the richness of each generation.

For more on Generations United visit www.gu.org/. For the full report Intergenerational Shared Sites: Saving Dollars While Making Sense, click here.

Evaluation of Virginia’s Child Protective Services Program

In 2008, under the principal investigation of Dr. Renee Loeffler, VTIPG conducted an evaluation of Virginia’s child protective services program under a contract with the Virginia Department of Social Services.  This work was a continuation of a multi-year project to assess the effects of the Differential Response System, a new approach to child protection adopted by the state in 2002.

VTIPG used statewide data on all child protective services cases in 2007 to assess outcomes and to analyze trends in key program variables.  A topic for special study in 2008 was the activities of Virginia’s local departments of social services in providing services to families to treat or prevent child abuse or neglect.  This project culminated in a report to the 2009 General Assembly.

VTIPG provided a separate report to each of Virginia’s 120 local departments of social services.  The local agency reports include local, regional and state data for key CPS program variables so that each local department can compare itself to regional neighbors and the state as a whole.

SSI Advocacy for Employment Options (SAFE) 2006 – 2009

Mary Beth Dunkenberger and Nancy White led the SSI Advocacy for Employment Options (SAFE) initiative to develop and deliver a training and technical assistance model for disability assessment and SSI advocacy for the TANF and VIEW programs.  The training and technical assistance was delivered to local departments of social services (LDSS) staff throughout the Commonwealth by Hazel B. Smith, program expert, and Nancy White.

This program focused on the identification and assessment of disabilities in persons participating in the TANF program with an emphasis on the Social Security Administration (SSA) definition of disability as related to Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).  Building this capacity will enable LDSS staff in the assessment process to determine if persons with disabilities may be served with accommodations in moving toward employment or if the disability appears so severe that a referral to the SSI program would be more appropriate.

The determination of a disability by LDSS staff as early in the assessment process as possible allows for a more efficient use of time sensitive recourses and will enable LDSS staff to inform TANF participants of the procedures, policies, and timeframes related to SSA determination of disability.  Local agencies will be able to structure a disability program that best meets the unique needs of the locality and participant population. The ultimate goal is that after the initial collaborative period, LDSS will have the capacity and organizational knowledge to assess TANF participant disabilities and provide ongoing SSI Advocacy services to TANF and VIEW participants as appropriate under policy and to meet the needs of the participant.

Fairfax County Federal Reimbursement Unit (FRU)

The FRU has ongoing responsibilities to facilitate the collection of centralized processes to secure child support from non-custodial parents on behalf of the children in foster care, to access Federal funds on behalf of children in foster care, and to pursue Medicaid funding for certain Medicaid eligible services for CSA funded youth placed out of their homes.

Under the guidance of Melony Price-Rhodes, the FRU reviews records of children in foster care and supports the process for reimbursements for those children. The reimbursement of local expenditures via federal funds reduces the local costs (expended by the Department of Family Services and through the Comprehensive Services Act (CSA)) of providing services to children in foster care.

The FRU continues to refine the process so that, where possible, fewer County tax dollars are spent to support children who are in foster care and in receipt of CSA pool funds.  More funds will be reimbursed from the Federal Government and parent(s) of the children.  Funds accessed for reimbursement, based upon each child’s eligibility, include Title IV-E, Title II and XVI – Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits, Survivors’ Benefits (SSA), Title XIX – Medicaid benefits and Title IV-D – Child Support.

Loudoun County, VA Comprehensive Services Act Program

Melony Price-Rhodes, Project Associate at VTIPG facilitated case reviews of foster care children in Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of identifying a group of funds for 70 to 100 foster care cases for children that are in foster care in Loudoun County, Virginia. The groups of funds include, Title IV-E, Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Benefits and Child Support. The case reviews will assess the efficacy of the current efforts by Loudoun County staff to maximize revenues for children in foster care.

Child and Family Services Review (FY 2005 – FY 2007)

VTIPG contracted with VDSS to conduct a two year program improvement plan for the Child and Family Services Review. IPG deployed a nine member team that included two graduate research assistants to review approximately 1700 foster care and child protective services cases. The results of each case review were included in an agency specific report with recommendations for each locality which was assembled into a statewide assessment of the aggregate data to meet 14 federally mandated performance goals.

Federal Reimbursement Unit Technical Assistance Team (FRU-TAT) 2001-2007

The Federal Resource Utilization Technical Assistance Team (FRU-TAT) created in 2001 under contract with The Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) and the Institute for Policy Outreach (IPO) had four active and distinct components – 1) Title IV-E review and program improvement; 2) SSI research and advocacy for Foster Care and TANF populations; 3) development of Automated Eligibility System; and 4) adoption subsidy analysis and review.

The FRU (2005-2007) provided quality assurance to VDSS in preparation for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) secondary review of Virginia’s Title IV-E foster care program conducted in March 2007.  On-site reviews of LDSS Title IV-E foster care case records selected by VDSS were conducted by the FRU during Phases I, II, and III by reviewing a total of 5,357 cases to ensure that cases identified as title IV-E eligible in OASIS met federal statutory eligibility requirements for foster care maintenance payments. The Specialists conducted payment record reviews on a pre-selected number of Title IV-E cases during the on-site reviews. They also conducted a financial records desk review of one Title IV-E case from each LDSS that reported a title IV-E payment case type in OASIS immediately prior to the secondary review. The financial reviews determined if title IV-E eligible cases were appropriately utilizing federal financial reimbursement.  The specialist served as regional consultants in the area of Title IV-E eligibility and in that capacity provided case consultation, monitoring, training, and technical assistance to LDSS on an as needed basis. At the conclusion of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) secondary review of Virginia’s Title IV-E foster care program, the Commonwealth of Virginia was considered to be in substantial compliance.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) efforts were focused on reviewing foster care records and making application for SSI on behalf of foster care children with identified disabilities.  A SSI-TANF effort was launched in Virginia Beach with a team member permanently stationed at Virginia Beach DSS to review and make applications for adults with disabilities who are currently participating in the VIEW program. At the conclusion of the project the team had an 85% application approval rate.

CURRICULUM

One of VTIPG’s responsibilities is to work with the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) and its academic programs to develop and propose nonprofit and nongovernmental organization related curricula at the undergraduate and graduate levels including concentrations, graduate certificates and potentially a freestanding graduate degree program in Nonprofit/ Nongovernmental Organization Management. Irrespective of specific content, the nonprofit/nongovernmental offerings share a number of characteristics, such as interdisciplinary faculty, a comparative focus, and integration of theory, practice and public policy implications.

Degree Concentrations

The concentration in public and nonprofit management in SPIA offers interested students the opportunity to study, in depth, public and nonprofit organization management tools, techniques, processes and policy contexts. Students may also pursue an additional focus in budgeting and financial management.

Doctoral Program

Students who wish to continue their studies in public and nonprofit management can matriculate into the inter-disciplinary doctoral program in Planning, Governance and Globalization (PGG). The program provides students with the flexibility to design a course of study that best meets their interests. Students in this PGG stream have engaged in research related to strategic planning processes in localities, health care in Africa, evaluation of long-term care, social class and migration, self-help housing and risk assessment.

Graduate Certificates

The School of Public and International Affairs currently offers a 12 hour certificate in Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organization Management. There is an online certificate option that includes many of the nonprofit courses and can be completed completely online.  See the Certificate Overview in the Virginia Tech Graduate Catalog for additional information.

How to Apply

Virginia Tech graduate students who are currently enrolled and working toward a degree should use the following to apply for entrance into the graduate certificate program in Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organization Management (NNMC). Individuals interest in enrolling in Virginia Tech and pursuing the graduate certificate should apply online at the Virginia Tech Graduate School website. The form can be found here.

AFFILIATED COURSES


UAP 5084G – Advanced Community Involvement 
Issues, concepts, and techniques of citizen participation in community development and planning. Theoretical foundation, instituational frameworks, and historical evolution of participatory democracy. Exercises developing group communication skills, public meeting facilitation, and design of community involvement programs. Pre-requisite: Graduate Standing Required
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5454 – Nonprofit Organization & Management 
Examines the nonprofit sector in American society and compares those roles with the roles the sector plays in other advanced democracies as well as in developing countries. Also analyzes the role of important sub sectors within the nation’s third sector and explores key management challenges confronting non-profit organization leaders with them. Compares those challenges to those found in nongovernmental organizations in developing nations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Undergraduate, Graduate

UAP 5534 – Nonprofit Organization Leadership and Governance 
Major conceptual issues related to developing an understanding of the foundations and roles of leadership and governance of third sector and nongovernmental organizations. Comparison of nongovernmental organizations in the U.S. and around the world. The course is designed to equip students with the capacities to assess and improve organizational governance effectiveness as well as to devise and implement leadership strategies in the complex structural, social and political contexts in which these organizations are typically enmeshed in the United States as well as in other industrialized democracies and in developing nations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Undergraduate, Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5034 – Democratic Governance in the Economy 
An international and comparative examination of workplace and economic relations around the world, with special focus on efforts to build collaborative work processes that would extend the voice, ownership and control rights of workers. The interface between state institutions and economic organizations is also considered, especially insofar as government prescriptions and processes that may impede or extend democratic governance of the economy. Graduate Standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA 5154 – Global Accountabilities
Provides a comparative perspective on “accountability” among nonprofit and non-governmental organizations, private corporations, governmental organizations, and inter-governmental organizations. Theories and practices of accountability, reporting, monitoring, compliance and learning are considered.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PSCI 5164 – Collaborative Governance and Civil Society 
Theoretical foundations of collaborative policy and governance approaches are examined. Strategies and methods for forming and sustaining collaborative coalitions are discussed. Case studies are used to illustrate the effectiveness of collaborative approaches in different policy domains. I
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA 5274 – Comparative Social Movements
This course will investigate the forms of public protest that occur all over the world, with special attention to activism in poor nations and to the recent emergence of transnational movements. Also examines why and when governments repress social movements. Explores movements that are grounded in collective identities based in class, race/ethnicity, gender, religion, and culture. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5354 – Charity, Philanthropy and Civil Society 
This course treats the evolution of philanthropy and charity in the United States and abroad and introduces major issues and continuing concerns linked to the institutiuons engaged in these activities while exploring their ties to civil society. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate
Instruction Type: Lecture

UAP 5364 – Non-Governmental Organizations in International Development 
Explores theory and cases of non-governmental organizations in international development. Analyzes various roles of NGOs, and their interactions with local communities, government agencies, international organizations, and private businesses. Examines tensions and collaborations between NGOs and other development actors, drawing from cases in environmental, health, and educational policy domains. II.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5444 – Strategic Planning and Management 
An examination of different processes and procedures for generic planning and management of a strategic nature. Particular emphasis on analytical techniques, especially Artificial Intelligence, that are used in the process.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5474 – Program Evaluation
Conceptual approaches and methodological techniques for evaluating national, regional, and local human services programs. Examination of issues relevant to the function of evaluation research and the role of evaluators.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5514 – Public Budgeting and Management 
Examines public budgeting and management theories, concepts, policies, processes, and practices, and their effects on federal, state, and local governments. Theoretical aspects of budgeting and management control are related to practical budgeting issues and exercises. Attention is also given to the internal management of the budgeting function.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PAPA 5544 – Public and Nonprofit Financial Management 
Examines concepts central to effective financial management of public and non-profit organizations. Affords students an opportunity to further their understanding of the relationship between financial accounting and reporting systems and effective organization management. II
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5564 – Information Technology, Society, and Public Policy 
Social impacts of new and emerging information technologies from a public policy perspective. Technical nature of IT and influences of IT on four core dimensions of society: political, economic, cultural, and spatial. Course integrates theoretical and philosophical literature on IT with applied policy and planning issues.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PSCI 5574 – Arts, Culture and Society
Considers the role of the arts in society, including architecture, music companies, or theater productions to heritage sites, science museums, and art galleries. Effective arts policy in revitalizing urban economies also examined. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP 5594 – Nonprofit Law and Ethics
Explores the legal, ethical and normative systems affecting nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations, both domestically and internationally. Examines the historical foundations of legal regulation and professional ethics within the sector and how these systems contribute to the administration and governance of nonprofit and nongovernamental organizations. Also surveys current theories of nonprofit/nongovernmental organization regulation as well as major legal and ethical issues confronting the sector. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/PAPA 5694 – Asset Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations 
Provides an understanding of asset management for governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental entities. Focuses on the essentials of cash budgeting and cash management, investment of endowments and pension funds, and debt management and debt financing for governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5974 – Independent Study
Credit Hours: 1 to 19
Lecture Hours: 1 to 19
Level(s): Graduate

UAP/GIA/PAPA 5984 – Special Study
Credit Hours: 1 to 19
Lecture Hours: 1 to 10
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 5674 – Financial Health of Public and Nonprofit Organizations 
Concepts and analytical capacities necessary to evaluate the overall level of financial health of governmental and nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations. Examines the tools and techniques necessary to assess the financial condition of the organizations and to determie if they have the capacity to carry out their purposes and address their debt obligations. Graduate Standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6114 – Complex Public Organizations
Examines the principal conceptual and theoretical bases for understanding the structure and environment of complex public organizations; also explores the problems bureaucracy poses for democratic theory and for vigorous economy.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6124 – Behavior and Change in Public Organizations 
Dynamics of behavior and change process in public sector organizations are examined for: (1) their implications for individuals, groups, and society; and (2) their impact upon organizational productivity and public policy. Critical dimensions of leadership as a sociopsychological process in management are emphasized with special reference to the public sector and public executives. The course also surveys the various types and strategies for planned change in public sector organizations.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

PAPA 6324 – Public Personnel Processes and Their Policy Implications 
Surveys the key personnel processes of public organizations, the contrasting norms and behaviors of participants, their impacts on policy, and their implications for democracy.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA 5004 – Power and Policy in the U.S.
Social science theory and research on the distribution of power in the US, especially as it shapes important national policy outcomes. Institutional and class bases of power will be examined, including membership on corporate boards and in policy-shaping think tanks. Implications for democracy in society will be drawn. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA 5004 – Community Involvement
Social science theory and research on the distribution of power in the US, especially as it shapes important national policy outcomes. Institutional and class bases of power will be examined, including membership on corporate boards and in policy-shaping think tanks. Implications for democracy in society will be drawn. Graduate standing.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5454 – Advanced Topics in Information Technology & Public Policy 
In-depth study and critical evaluation of selected complex issues related to information technology, society, governance, and public policy. Focused attention is given to theoretical and methodological foundations of the area of inquiry and to specific domains of policymaking and implementation. Topics will be selected from IT-related issues in such areas of concern as: cities, local communities, nonprofit organizations, governments, and global networks. May be repeated on a different topic. Must meet prerequisite or have permission of instructor.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5554 – Culture, Politics and Society in Network Environments 
Historical origins, institutional foundations, and theoretical interpretations of cultural, political, and social interaction through computer mediated communication are examined. Particular attention is given to new types of discourse, sources of power, and structures of society at all geographical levels in global computer and communications networks.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 5554 – Democracy Begond the Ballot 
Forms of ultra or enhanced democracy outside of state institutions, particulary those developing in third sector organizations, theories of democracy and research on functioning deliberative democracies at the grassroots level, in societal or international institutions. Graduate standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

GIA/PSCI 6224 – Competing Conceptions of the Third Sector
Competing Conceptions of the Third Sector Competing theories and conceptions of the third sector in relation to the for-profit firm and the state with international perspectives on voluntary grassroots action challenges and societal transformation. Integration of theoretical and research literatures in the field. Graduate Standing required.
Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Level(s): Graduate

FACULTY



Max Stephenson, Jr.
IPG Director

Research Areas:

  • Nonprofit/NGO governance, leadership, management & civil society
  • Public policy & policy theory
  • Peacebuilding, international development & democratization
  • Environmental politics, policy & planning

Email | Read CV

Mary Beth Dunkenberger 
Senior Program Director & Business Manager, Blacksburg

Research Areas:

  • Connections between social programs, economic & community development
  • Organizational and program assessments
  • Policy and program innovations

Email | Read Bio

Melony Price-Rhodes, Ph. D. 
Senior Program Director, Alexandria

Research Areas:

  • Child welfare, revenue maximization, foster care and child protective services
  • Federal and state regulations affecting Federal Reimbursement Unit activities

Email | Photography Collection

David Moore
Senior Research Associate, Project Director (TAP) Swiftstart

Research Areas:

  • Nonprofit/NGO & governance, leadership, management & civil society
  • Public policy & policy theory
  • Early childhood & workforce development
  • Organizational development & capacity building

Email | Read Bio

Elizabeth Allen
Assistant Business Manager, Program Research Associate, Data Manager

Research Areas:

  • Develop and maintain data management for asset mapping/web portal prototype and gap analyses
  • Administer and report results of on-line survey instruments
  • Coordinate and co-facilitate focus groups/structured interviews
  • Report preparation and generate tables and charts for stakeholder meetings and project contractors

Email | Read Bio

Maya Berinzon
Research Associate

Research Areas:

  • Law & International Development
  • Comparative Law
  • Access to information
  • Regional focus in sub-Saharan Africa


Don Back
VTIPG Senior Fellow

Research Areas:

  • Higher Education Financing, Governance and Leadership
  • Higher Education Policy and Practice
  • Internationalization of Higher Education
  • International Development

Email | Bio

Andy Morikawa
VTIPG Senior Fellow

Email

Martha Mead
VTIPG Fellow

Email

Minnis Ridenour
VTIPG Fellow, Resource Development

Research Areas:

  • Resource development
  • Financial management for governmental & nonprofit organizations

Email | Read Bio

George Still
VTIPG Fellow

Research Areas:

  • Support IPG / Pursue Grants
  • Consultation
  • Assist with reports & articles for publication

Edward Weisband
VTIPG Fellow, Endowed Chair, Political Science

Research Areas:

  • International monitoring regimes
  • Global accountabilities
  • Core international labor standard

Email | Read Bio


Suzanne Lo
Project Associate

Marcy Schnitzer
Assistant Provost for Diversity and Strategic Planning

Katy Powell
Professor of English and Director of the Center for Rhetoric in Society

Nancy White
Senior Consultant

Research Areas:

  • Policy design
  • Administration
  • Nonprofit and nongovernmental organizational evaluations

Email | Read Bio

Lyusyena Kirakosyan
VTIPG Senior Project Associate

Email

Rachel Christensen
VTIPG Senior Project Associate

STAFF


Karen Boone
Financial Manager

Responsibilities:

  • Finances
  • Payroll – Wage
  • Travel
  • Human Resources
  • Reconciling
  • Facilities
  • Maintain Records

540-231-1118
Email

Regina Naff
Administrative Assistant

Responsibilities:

  • Administrative Assistant to the Director
  • Fixed Assets Manager
  • Web Content Coordinator
  • Editor of the IPG Quarterly Newsletter
  • Secondary assistance for miscellaneous office procedures

540-231-6775
Email

Wanda Mills
Web Content Administrator

Responsibilities:

  • Web Designer
  • Digital Content Management
  • IPG Website Administration

Email

Hazel Smith – Consulting Staff
Researcher

Responsibilities:

  • SSI Advocacy for Adults & Children

Email | Read Bio

Tanisha Capers
Project Specialist

Responsibilities:

  • Provides administrative and logistics support to the FRU management and staff
  • Human Resources Information System (HRIS) Banner representative
  • Assist with activities that secure initial and continued eligibility for children in receipt of CSA funds for other public assistance programs, specifically Title II (Social Security), Title IV-E, Title IV-D (Child Support), Title XVI (Supplemental Security Income)

Email

Vickie Grazioli
Data Entry Technician

Responsibilities:

  • Provides technical support to the FRU Medicaid Case Analyst in obtaining appropriate collateral information to evaluate initial and continuing eligibility for continuing Comprehensive Services (CSA) and Title XIX (Medicaid) eligibility for each child served by Fairfax County Comprehensive Services Act (CSA).

Email

Claudia Malenich
Court Specialist

Responsibilities:

  • Prepare and file Civil Petitions for Support at the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court
  • Perform all activities related to establishing Judicial Support Orders (JSOs) in juvenile court
  • Maintain accurate knowledge of relevant federal and state law, rules and regulations for Title IV-D funding

Email

Erin Mooney
Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Determine the initial eligibility of children in receipt of CSA funds for other public assistance programs, specifically Title II (Social Security), Title IV-E (AFDC-FC), Title IV-D (Child Support), Title XVI (Supplemental Security Income), and to maintain the child’s continuing eligibility
  • Comprehensive knowledge of complex federal and state laws governing public assistance programs
  • Ability to research, obtain, interpret, and integrate information from many sources
  • Thorough knowledge of physiological and mental health impairments. Expertise in assessing and evaluating functional limitations based on medical and/or mental health records

Email

Peter Flint
FRU CSA Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Process Comprehensive Services Act (CSA) copayment assessments for CSA supported agencies
  • Primary point of contact regarding the copayment process for CSA supported agencies
  • Research, analyze, and prepare statistics and information to assist the FRU Project Director with contract deliverables as necessary

Email

Brian Zamora
FRU CSA Case Analyst

Responsibilities:

  • Analyze state uniform assessment instrument-the CANS document. Contact case manager if follow-up is required
  • Maintain accurate knowledge of relevant federal and state laws, local regulations, policies, and practices through reviews of publications, communications and training sessions with CSA and FRU management and staff
  • Research, analyze, and prepare statistics and information to assist the Project Director with contract deliverables as necessary. Provide Project Director and relevant CSA management and staff (as requested) with data and assistance as necessary for projects

Email

AFFILIATED STUDENTS


Master’s Students

Henry Ayakwah (MURP)
Leeann Budzevski (MURP)
Erin Burcham (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Nathan Corso (MPIA-MIP)
Dinah Girma (MURP)
Beth Olberding (MURP/MNR-MIP)
Lara Nagle (MURP)

Ph.D. Students

  Carmen Boggs-Parker (PGG)
Lindy Cranwell (PGG)
Mary Beth Dunkenberger (PAPA)
Jeremy Elliott-Engel (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Rachel Gabriele (PGG)
Benjamin Grove (PGG)
Vanessa Guerra (PGG)
Sarah Hanks (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Jake Keyel (PGG)
Kyunghee Kim (Arch.and Design)
Kristin Kirk (PGG)
Sarah Lyon-Hill (PGG)
Lorien MacAuley (Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education)
Neda Moayerian (PGG)
Cheryl Montgomery (PGG)
David Moore (PAPA)
Oladayo Omosa (Agricultural, Leadership and Community Education)
Hamza Safouane (PGG)
Danny White (PGG)

Research PhD Students

 Laura Nelson – PhD (Human Development)

Visiting PhD Students

Yunyun Chen
Chunxue Mu

Congratulations the following VTIPG Affiliated Students who recently obtained their master’s:

Kaitlyn Fitzgerald (MPIA), May 2017
Kristin Haas (MPIA), May 2017
Heather Lyne (MPIA) May 2017
Natalie Patterson (MURP), May 2017

Congratulations the following VTIPG Affiliated Students who recently obtained their Ph.D.:

 Lorien MacAuley (Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education), Dec 2017

AFFILIATIONS, PARTNERS, & SPONSORS


Government Organizations
United States Forest Service
National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement, DHHS
United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Services
Virginia Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services
Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development
Virginia Department of Social Services
Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles
Council on Virginia’s Future
Fairfax County Department of Social Services
Pulaski County Department of Social Services
Giles County Department of Social Services
Montgomery County Department of Social Services
Floyd County Department of Social Services
Dinwiddie County Department of Social Services
Radford City Department of Social Services
New River Valley Planning District Commission
Arlington Economic Development
Fairfax County-Northern Virginia Nonprofit Partnership
Virginia Department of Veterans Services
Virginia Center for Innovative Technology

Nonprofit Organizations
The Women’s Resource Center of the New River Valley
Carpenter’s Shelter for Homeless Children, Families and Adults
United Way of Henry County and Martinsville
New River Community Action
Generations United
Virginia Community Healthcare Association
Jefferson Center in Roanoke
Free Clinic of Franklin County
Rockbridge County Free Clinic
Southwest Virginia Second Harvest Food Bank
Brain Injury Services of Southwest Virginia, Inc.
Mental Health America of Roanoke Valley
Rescue Mission – Roanoke Valley

Foundations
Community Foundation of the New River Valley
Bertlessman Foundation
Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Carilion Foundation
Roanoke Times Landmark Communications Foundation
Ford Foundation
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
W. K. Kellogg Foundation

Centers and Institutes 
Institute for Society, Culture, and the Environment
The Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention
Virginia Bioinformatics Institute
World Disaster Risk Management Institute
Center for Gerontology
Virginia Tech Southwest Center
Virginia Tech Hampton Roads Center
Metropolitan Institute
Community Design Assistance Center
Southern Virginia Higher Education Center
Virginia Rural Health Association

DIRECTIONS

NOTICE

Parking at IPG is now under University Policy

To reach the campus from Interstate 81 (southbound and northbound):

  1. From Interstate 81, take Exit 118 to reach the exit ramps for all three of the exits at this location. There is only one exit ramp serving the exits; missing the ramp means a trip north to Exit 128 or south to Exit 114 to turn around.
  2. Take Exit 118B onto U.S. 460 West. This exit connects directly to the Christiansburg Bypass. Follow the signs for Blacksburg/Virginia Tech. The U.S. 460 bypass between Blacksburg and Christiansburg is a limited-access highway from 1-81 to the campus entrance at Southgate Drive.
  3. Watch signs carefully for routes and directions. From the bypass, Bus. U.S. 460 — South Main Street, exits to the right (take South Main Street as one route to reach downtown Blacksburg).
  4. Keep left and stay on U.S. 460 West, signed for “Virginia Tech, Bluefield” to continue directly to the university.
  5. Drive for 2.5 miles on U.S. 460 to the traffic light at VA 314, Southgate Drive. Turn right onto Southgate Drive. There is a campus map a quarter-mile on the right and the Visitor Information Center is a half-mile from U.S. 460 on the right.
  6. Continue to the stoplight at Spring Road and turn left onto Spring.
  7. Continue past Lane Stadium and Cassell Coliseum to the stop sign at Washington Street and turn right onto Washington.
  8. Continue through the stop sign at Kent Street and take the first left after the stop sign onto Otey Street.
  9. Continue past Wall Street and at the bottom of the hill turn right onto Roanoke Street.
  10. We are the last house on the right (at the corner of Roanoke Street and Draper Road).

CONTACT US

Let VTIPG and Virginia Tech put theory and knowledge to work for you! If you are interested in collaborating with us, please contact us:

The Institute is located in Alexandria and Blacksburg, Virginia.

Regina Naff
Administrative Assistant
Institute for Policy & Governance
201 West Roanoke Street (0489)
Blacksburg, VA 24061
Office: (540) 231-6775
Fax: (540) 231-6722
E-mail: regina50@vt.edu


Dr. Melony Price-Rhodes
Senior Program Director
Institute for Policy & Governance
1021 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Office: (703) 324-7309
E-mail: mpricerh@vt.edu

For more information, please contact the Institute’s Director.

Dr. Max O. Stephenson, Jr.
201 West Roanoke St.
Blacksburg , VA 24061
Office: (540) 231-7340
E-mail: mstephen@vt.edu

NEWS

Second Volume of RE:Reflections and Explorations Now Published

Colleagues and friends, I am delighted to inform you that the second volume in the RE: Reflections and Explorations series has now been published. You may find an electronic version of this new book, edited by myself and Lyusyena Kirakosyan here: http://doi.org/10.21061/vtipg.re.v2.  We will be holding a reception to celebrate this occasion in early February and will send along notice of that event in due course. Meanwhile, Happy Holidays to you and yours from the Institute for Policy and Governance at Virginia Tech!

Best wishes, Max

Veterans in Society Conference – Call for Papers

The 4th Annual Veterans in Society Conference will be held on March 26-28, 2018 at the Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center, Roanoke, VA.

Proposals due January 6, 2017

Veterans, Globalized: Veterans and their Societies in International Perspective

The Conference takes issues raised by the First World War as its point of departure to encourage research and generate scholarly conversations across disciplines and eras that consider the interplay of veterans and their societies in transnational or international perspective. To that end, we foresee juxtaposing explicitly comparative work with scholarship that delves into specific national, cultural, or historical contexts.

For more information, here is the link for the conference:  http://www.cpe.vt.edu/vis/

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary (250th) has been posted!!

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted:  Fear and the Moral Imagination: The Oil and Water of Democratic Self-Governance.

Note to Readers: This essay marks a milestone, as it is the 250th Soundings—the column first appeared on January 17, 2010. Thank you to all who have encouraged me to write these commentaries and who have offered their comments, positive and negative, concerning my efforts. I am very much in your debt. The next Soundings will appear on January 8, 2018. Happy Holidays to all! MOS

Neda Moayerian passed her Prelim defense

We are happy to announce that Neda Moayerian passed her Prelim defense on Monday, November 27. She is ready to advance to the next stage of the PhD program, the Proposal Defense. Her Doctoral advisory committee members are: Kwame Harrison (Sociology), Nancy McGhee (Tourism and Hospitality Management), Laura Zanotti (Political Science) and chair, Max Stephenson (Professor of Public and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for Policy and Governance). Congratulations Neda and best wishes going forward! We know you will do well.

Advancing the Human Condition Symposium

Several SPIA colleagues are participating this week in The Advancing the Human Condition Symposium, an Initiative of  Beyond Boundaries and The Equity and Social Disparity in the Human Condition Strategic Growth Area, November 28 – 30th and held in the Inn at VT. Max Stephenson is a discussant for the November 28th session (from 3:30 to 5:00) on Story Making as Cultural Work: Exploring Ontological Politics and Social Change in Communities of Struggle. Christian Matheis will be a panel member for the session, Interrogating what is meant by “Advancing the Human Condition” at 10:30 on November 29th. Sara Mattingly-Jordan will be a discussant for the panel Ethics and Engineering at 1:00 on the 29th. David Bieri, Ralph Hall, Max Stephenson and Christian Matheis will all participate in the session, The Beloved Community Initiative: Advancing the Human Condition through Inclusive, Sustainable Economics, 2:00 on the 30th. This session is organized jointly by the Beloved Community Initiative and the Policy Strategic Growth Area. There are many panels and promising discussions throughout both days.  Click here for the link to the schedule of events.

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted!

Max Stephenson’s latest Soundings commentary has been posted:  Reflections on Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address at Thanksgiving.

 I am posting Max’s Soundings early because I will be out of town and will not have internet access most of the time.

Wishing you and yours a very Happy and Safe Thanksgiving.  Thank you for reading and enjoy!

Danny White Passes proposal defense

Danny White, PGG PhD candidate, passed his proposal defense on Monday, November 13, 2017.  The title of his dissertation is:  “Sport and Social Capital:  Perceptions of Civil Society Organizations in Kigali, Rwanda”.  His committee includes:  Chair, Max Stephenson (Director of IPG), David Kniola (Professor School of Education), John Dooley (CEO of Virginia Tech Foundation),and Jocelyn Widmer (Director for Online Degree Programs at U of Florida).  Congratulations Danny and best wishes as you progress through the next phase of your PhD work!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Trade Agreements and Democracyby Simone Franzi, (PGG PhD student).

Thank you for reading.

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Youth as a Social Construct, by Nada Berrada, PhD student, ASPECT.

Thank you for reading and enjoy!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted!

The latest RE: Reflections and Explorations has been posted:  Strategic Use of Media in Mobilizing – Khunti Diaries, by Pallavi Raonka, PhD candidate, Scoiology.

Thank you for reading and enjoy!

Email

Urban Affairs Association 48th Annual Conference

April 4-7, 2018 | Sheraton Toronto Centre Hotel | Toronto, CN
Abstract/Session Proposal Deadline:  October 1, 2017

Shaping Justice and Sustainability Within and Beyond the City’s Edge:
Contestation and Collaboration in Urbanizing Regions

In an era of globalizing forces, the region has become an important arena for collaboration and contestation, as metropolitan areas work to craft their individual identities. As they do so, questions of equity, inclusion, and sustainability remain. What is the role of diversity, difference and singularity of social actors and communities when it comes to forging visions of urban development that are collective in process, cohesive in vision and sustainable in implementation? Furthermore, as global financial systems exert greater control over national, regional, and local economies, what is the role of innovative and/or insurgent social practices in an urbanizing region? What are the most effective strategies to create environmentally and economically sustainable communities in a regional context? How will different factions of regional actors evolve given conventional relationships, increased social and cultural diversity, and the contradictions of competitiveness and solidarity?

Abstract/Proposal Deadline: UAA will not accept any proposals (of any kind) after October 1, 2017, 12 midnight Central Daylight Time (CDT) or 5:00am GMT. The online submission site will close at 12:01 am CDT.  Acceptance or rejection notices will be sent by November 30,2017.

Questions? Visit the UAA website: http://urbanaffairsassociation.org/conference/ (for info on proposal submissions, registration,hotel reservations,etc.), or contact us at mailto:conf@uaamail.orgor 1-414-229-3025.

APSA 2016 Annual Meeting

APSA 2016 Annual Meeting
September 1-4, 2016
Great Transformations: Political Science and the Big Questions of Our Time
Philadelphia, PA

Voluntary Action History Society 25th Anniversary Conference

Voluntary Action History Society 25th Anniversary Conference
July 13-15, 2016
Thinking about the Past; Thinking about the Future
University of Liverpool

October 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

July 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

From the Director: Tidings Quarterly Reflection:

The “Beloved Community:” Aspiring to be a Truly Free and Self-Governing Society

Opportunities

Call for Submissions (deadline September 15, 2017) The Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development is seeking submissions for publication in the Continue reading 

April 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

January 2017 Newsletter

Thank you to all who were a part of putting this together, and thank you for reading!

DIRECTOR’S CORNER

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

BLACKSBURG

WASHINGTON, DC

RICHMOND

BLACKSBURG

WASHINGTON, DC

RICHMOND

BLACKSBURG

WASHINGTON, DC

RICHMOND