Ph.D in Planning, Governance, & Globalization (PGG-GG) 2018-02-09T17:52:42+00:00

     PGG

         PhD IN PLANNING, GOVERNANCE, & GLOBALIZATION

      PGG

        PhD IN PLANNING, GOVERNANCE, & GLOBALIZATION

Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG)

The doctoral program in Planning, Governance & Globalization is a spin-off from the Environmental Design and Planning (EDP) Ph.D. Program in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies. Initiated in 1975, the EDP program has grown not only in enrollment but also in specializations or streams as the College has become more diverse through restructuring. Effective spring 2007, EDP spun off two separate Ph.D. degrees, Planning, Governance & Globalization (PGG) in the School of Public & International Affairs and Architecture Design Research (ADR) in the School of Architecture + Design.

PGG HAS TWO TRACKS WITHIN THE DEGREE

The GG track is supported by faculty in Government and International Affairs

Thematic Areas in the Governance & Globalization track

  • Governance, Institutions & Civil Society
  • Globalization, Identities, Security, & Economies

The UEDP track is supported by faculty in Urban Affairs and Planning

Thematic Areas in the Urban & Environmental Design & Planning track

  • Metropolitan Development
  • Community & Economic Development Planning
  • International Development Planning
  • Environmental Planning & Sustainability
  • Landscape Planning & Analysis
  • Transportation Planning
  • Physical Planning & Urban Design

The Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG) draws together insights from the social sciences and humanities in order to study governance processes at all levels of society and international affairs.

The PGG program, managed by Government and International Affairs, offers a unique environment in which faculty and students work closely together to build a research-based program in which students use an interdisciplinary framework to leverage their professional experiences when exploring scholarly puzzles.

Possible research areas include:

  • US foreign policy,
  • new global security threats,
  • conflict resolution,
  • studies in critical geopolitics,
  • global social policy,
  • global political economy,
  • international development challenges and institutions,
  • social movements and
  • political systems.

Faculty expertise covers the regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America.

Many of our PGG students are professionals working in the Washington D.C area working in research positions and a range of nonprofit/NGO, public and private organizations at national and international levels.

The PGG program consists on 90 credit hours. This consists of a mixture of coursework (up to 30 hours) and research and dissertation hours. Student can transfer in up to 30 hours from their Master’s degree.
Program is offered in Blacksburg and the Washington D.C (National Capital Region) campuses
Program is open to full and part-time students
Flexible scheduling through online and evening courses
Individualized guidance from faculty advisers
Scholarships and tuition support
Prior graduate credits can be counted towards the degree
Rolling admissions
Classes are offered in the evenings and online to accommodate working professionals and PGG students may enroll part-time. Nearly all courses are taught by regular, full-time faculty.

A limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available each year. Students interested in receiving an assistantship need to apply to the PGG program by 15 February.

Who Should Consider This Degree?

– Professionals and active military in the DC metro area aiming at pursuing a PhD degree while working full time

– Full-time students wishing to work towards their PhD degree, while networking in the Washington policy environment.

– students interested in pursuing an academic career.

CURRENT AND PAST RESEARCH TOPICS

Possible research areas include the US foreign policy, new security threats, conflict resolution, geopolitics, social policy, international finance, economics, and development, the environment and natural resources, and social movements.

The faculty has particular strengths in post-Soviet Eurasia, the Balkans, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Dissertation topics – In progress  

  • Eric Reading – the dynamics shaping global development assistance.
  • Dallas Shaw – military and civilian interventions in “weak”, “failing” and “failed states”.
  • Gabriel Mitchell – the relationship between energy policy and foreign policy in Israel and the Eastern Mediterranean.
  • Craig M. Johnson – international organizations and nuclear security.
  • Gregory Kruczek – nationalism, conflict and Middle Eastern Christian communities
  • Martin Cho – International policy and new energy technology.
  • Carl Ciovacco – Perceptions of threat and US-China relations.
  • Jeanette Ruiz – Informal networks and communication technologies.
  • Pishtiwan Jawal – political Islam, democracy and the Kurdish issue.
  • Gela Merabishvili – Sub-national actors’ influence in international politics.
  • Joe Karle – US nation building efforts in the Middle East since 9/1.
  • Kevin Rosier – international political economy and development.
  • Ashleigh Breske – The governance of repatriation-returning history in a globalized world
  • Putu Desy Apriliani – The effects of microfinance on gender relations in Bali’
  • Jake Keyel – Social and political pressures on, and self-perceptions of, Iraqi refugees in the United States
  • Brett R. Netto – the English School of International Relations Theory and Russian perception of International Society.

Recently Defended Ph.D dissertations:

  • Adis Maksic, 2014, NCR – “Mobilizing for Ethnic Violence? Ethno-National Political Parties and the Dynamics of Ethno Politicization”.
  • David Belt, 2014, NCR – “A Muslim-led Strategy for Countering Violent Extremism”.
  • Michelline Stokes, 2015, Blacksbug – “The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and New River Valley, VA”.
  • Arnold Dupuy, 2016, NCR – “Changing Patterns of Regionalism and Security in the Wider Black Sea Area: The Transformative Impact of Energy”.
  • Bryan Riddle, 2016, NCR – “Accounting for Counterinsurgency Doctrines and Solutions to Warfighting Failures in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghnistan”
  • Sonya Finley,  2016, NCR – “Recommending Political Warfare: The Role of Eisenhower’s Committee on International Information Activities in the US’s Approach to the Cold War”.

PGG ADMISSIONS

Admission to PGG program is based on a combination of four criteria:

  • Performance in Master’s program/Academic Transcript
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Statement of purpose/interest in program
  • Professional background and experience

The PGG program does not have an application deadline but has a ‘rolling admissions’ policy. As a general guideline, applications for Fall Admissions (Fall semester starts in late August) should be filed by 15 July, and applications for Spring admissions (spring semester starts in late January) should be filed by 1 January in order to allow time for review.  Applications for Summer admission is 15 April

A limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available each year.  Students wishing to be considered for one of these assistantships should apply by 15 February.

Students can be admitted to the PGG degree program in the Fall, Spring, and Summer. However, it is recommended that students enter in the Fall or Spring semesters as our foundational courses are taught face to face during the Fall and Spring semesters

What to Prepare

  1. Prospective student need to prepare a statement of interest, detailing their proposed area of research, their professional background and experience (if applicable) and their interest in pursuing a doctorate at Virginia Tech.  They should include a professional resume.
  2. Academic Transcripts – Master’s and undergraduate
  3. Three letters of recommendation from a mix of former professors and others who have had the opportunity to observe the applicant in an academic and  professional capacity.
  4. GRE scores of at least 1100, verbal and quantitative.  Non-traditional, part-time working professionals can make a case for the GRE to be waived. Applicants wishing to request a waver are encouraged to come to an information session or contact the program director, Prof. Joel Peters to be considered.

Test Drive this Degree

Are you uncertain about enrolling in this program but would be interested in trying a class?

Many of our doctoral students, especially part-time students who are working professionals in the Washington D.C area, start the PGG program as a non-degree Commonwealth Campus student.

Commonwealth Campus status is open to an applicant who holds an earned bachelors or higher degree from a regionally accredited U.S. university. Examples of students who seek admission into the Commonwealth Campus program include those who may qualify for regular admission but do not currently wish apply immediately for a graduate degree or need to update their academic credentials after several years of professional experience.

If students perform well in the courses they take, they can build a case for admission into the PGG degree. Students can take up to twelve credit hours (typically four classes) as a non-degree Commonwealth Campus student.

Get info on our non-degree programs

International Students

Please note that International students must have a decision on their applications no later than the following deadlines:

For Fall Admissions – 1 April

For applications for Spring admissions – 1 September.

Please allow plenty of time for the review of your application.  Any decisions made after these time frames need to be approved in advance and on a case-by-case basis, by the Graduate School’s International Graduate Student Services staff.  The contact email is intlncr@vt.edu.

Evidence of English Proficiency: International applicants are exempt from demonstrating English proficiency if they have graduated from an accredited university where English is the language of instruction or if they are U.S. permanent residents (“green card” holders).

International applicants may demonstrate English proficiency by submitting scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). A minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based test (PBT) or 80 on the internet-based test (iBT) is required for consideration of the application.

International students in F-1 or J-1 status who obtained admission into a degree program are eligible for consideration by the academic departments for assistantships and in-state tuition scholarships.

CURRENT PGG-GG STUDENTS

Putu Desy Apriliani putuda8@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Nada Berrada nada1@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisors: Professor Max Stephenson and Dr. Patricia Nickel

Carmen Boggs-Parker cabooker@vt.edu
Intercultural Learning in Cross-cultural Contexts
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Ashleigh Breske aslilly@vt.edu
Governance of Repatriation, Cultural Property in Politically Unstable Regions
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Luis Camacho lcamacho@vt.edu
Economic Development, Sociology of Work, Innovation and Technology in Workplaces, Participatory Management Practices, Dignity at Work
Primary Advisor: Dr. Joyce Rothschild

Martin Cho martinhc@vt.edu
Geopolitics and Development of Energy Resources
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Carl Ciovacco carl7@vt.edu
International Relations and Global Security
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Ben Coleman bencoleman@vt.edu
International Political Economy, Macroeconomics, Finance, Central Banking, Economic History
Primary Advisor:  Dr. Giselle Datz

Lindy Cranwell lindycra@vt.edu
International Education, Higher Education, Faculty Engagement in Comprehensive Internationalization, University Student Global Mobility
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Jonathan Elliott jtelliott@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Simone Franzi franzisimone@vt.edu
Global Political Economy, The Politics and Geography of Trade Agreements
Primary Advisor: Dr. David Bieri

Rachel Gabriele rachelvg@vt.edu
Collaborative Governance in Revitalizing Cities
Primary Advisors: Professor Max Stephenson and Dr. Maggie Cowell

Jen Gooding jgooding@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Ben Grove ben.grove@vt.edu
Leadership of NGOs
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Terken Gupur terken@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Helen Horton helenuva@yahoo.com
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Jim Bohland

Pishtiwan Jalal pishti1@vt.edu
Terrorism, Islamic Radicalism, Political Islam, Democracy and the Kurdish Issue
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Marc Jasper marcwj62@vt.edu
Nationalism; US Military Intervention; Balkans, Caucasus & Middle East Conflict & Area Studies: Peace Operations & Low-intensity Conflict; Conflict Resolution
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Craig Johnson cjohn5x@vt.edu
Post-Cold War Nuclear Security Regimes
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Adna Karamehic akara@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Joseph Karle karle1jb@vt.edu
Analyzing US nation building efforts in the Middle East since 9/11, particularly the way interactions between US personnel and local leaders (governmental and military) impact the development of governance and security structures
Primary Advisor:  Professor Joel Peters

Jared “Jake” Keyel jaredk1@vt.edu
Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, Critical Theory
Primary Advisors: Dr. Patricia Nickel and Professor Tim Luke

Maksym Kolos mkolos@ukr.net
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Gregory Kruczek kruczek1@vt.edu
Lebanon/Syia; Lebanese Civil War; Nationalism studies, Modern Levantine History
Primary Advisors: Dr. Ariel Ahram and Professor Joel Peters

Walter “Rick” Landgraf wfland3@vt.edu
DeFacto States; Ethnic Conflicts; Russian Foreign Policy; NATO-Russia Relations; Visual Geopolitics
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Benjamin Louis bflouis@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professors Joyce Rothschild and Edward Weisband

Sarah Lyon-Hill sarahlh@vt.edu
Theater Arts and Community Economic Development
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Julian R. Meade julian67@vt.edu
Geopolitics of the Arctic Region
Primary Advisor:  Professor Joel Peters

Tiernan Mennen tiernkm@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Giselle Datz

Gela Merabishvili gm88@vt.edu
How sub-state actors, such as cities and regions, influence international politics; the EU, particularly its foreign and security policy, Russia, and the countries in their shared neighborhood
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Allison D. Miller ahern09@vt.edu
Community Cohesion and Countering Violent Extremism: An Ethnographic Analysis of Selected Global Communities
Primary Advisors:  Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Priya Dixit

Gabriel Mitchell gabim14@vt.edu
Regionalism, majority-minority politics, and the formation of state foreign policy. His dissertation explores the relationship between energy policy and foreign policy in Israel and the Eastern Mediterranean
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Brett R. Netto brettn76@vt.edu
Dissertation Title: Russia as a Great Power: An English School Approach to Yeltsin’s Presidency (1991-200)
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Sulayman Njie sauln@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Eric Reading ereading@vt.edu
Political Transitions, International Development, Middle East
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Alana Romanella aromanel@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Kevin Rosier kjrosier@vt.edu
International political economy, macroeconomics, and international development
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

Jeanette Ruiz ruizjr@vt.edu
Understanding How Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) Impact and Empower Informal Networks as these Networks Develop Tools for Re-shaping Economies, Polities, and International Relations
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

Kevin Saderup kevin57@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Hamza Safouane hsafouan@vt.edu
Migration and Migratory Journey Narratives, Apparatus of Capture of Mobility in the EU and Tactics of Escape
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Dallas Shaw dallas69@vt.edu
U.S. Military Interventions in Counterinsurgencies: Military Governance Versus Military Assistance to Governance
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Ethan Tabor etabor6@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

John Terpinas terp@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Donald Tighe donaldvt@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Lacy Watson elw3@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Michael Wiener mtwiener@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Khodr Zaarour kaazrour@vt.edu
Intl Relations, US Foreign & Security Policy, emphasis: transnational crime & contentious politics in the Greater Middle East
Primary Advisors: Professor Karen Hult and Professor Joyce Rothschild

Xiaochen Zhang zxc@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

PGG-GG ALUMNI

Maurice Binioube Aleyao aleyb06@vt.edu
An Investigation of NGO-Government Partnerships for Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS and Malaria in the Maritime Region of Togo
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Don Back dback@vt.edu
Neoliberalism, Academic Capitalism and Higher Education in Developing Countries
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Beth Beck bethbeck@vt.edu
“The Spark that Ignites the Creative Idea: An Examination of the Group Practice of LAUNCH
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Emily Barry-Murphy emilybar@vt.edu
Democratizing the Refugee Regime Complex
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

David Belt beltdavid@gmail.com
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Arnold C. Dupuy acdupuy@vt.edu
Patterns of Regionalism and Security: Energy as a Transformational Influence in the Black Sea Area.
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Heba F. El-Shazli heba@vt.edu
Political Role of Labor Movements in the MENA Region Contributing to the Arab Spring
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Anna Erwin erwinae@vt.edu
Food Systems, Participatory Democracy, Social Justice
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Sonya Finley sonyalf@vt.edu
U.S. Foreign Policy, Public Diplomacy/Psychological Warfare, Defense Strategy
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Stefanie Georgakis Abbott stefieg@vt.edu
Critical International Relations Theory, European Union Politics, Border Studies, Immigration
Primary Advisors: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Eric Hodges ebhodges@usf.edu
Democratic Theory, Civic Engagement, Military Veterans, Moral Philosophy, and Cosmopolitanism
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Emily Howard Ray Emily.Ray@sonoma.edu
Environmental political theory and environmental politics, with particular interest in land-use conflicts, social movements, and feminist theory
Primary Advisory: Professor Tim Luke

Mahin Khan mahin@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Sabithulla Khan khanpgg@vt.edu
Philanthropy, Civil Society, Muslim Societies in the U.S and Middle East, Inter-faith Work and Civic Engagement
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Adis Maksic adismax@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

William Bryan Riddle briddle@lmi.org
The Essence of Desperation:  Accounting for Counterinsurgency Doctrines as Solutions to Warfighting Failures in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Nicole Sanderlin npsander@vt.edu
Internationalization of Higher Education, Faculty Engagement, and Strategic Planning
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Adriana Seagle aseagle@vt.edu
The English School, Sub-global Regional Int’l Societies, Intelligence Practices w/in Military Alliances, European Security and Foreign Policies
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Michelline Stokes sjmichey@vt.edu
Deindustrialization and Household Survival Strategies, Globalization, and Women and Work
Primary Advisor: Drs. Giselle Datz and Dale Wimberley

Sarah Surak smsurak@salisbury.edu
Dissertation: Bringing in the Garbage: Opening a critical space for vehicle disposal practices
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Courtney Thomas courts.thomas@gmail.com
Political Economy, Food Politics, and Mass Political Violence
Primary Advisor: Professor Edward Weisband

Mark Thorum thorun1@cs.com
Dissertation: Essays in International Financial Governance
Primary Advisor: Professors Tim Luke and Charles Taylor

Bart Yavorosky bartyav@vt.edu
Interest Group Politics, Administrative Rulemaking, Public Policy, Nonprofit Leadership, Volunteer Management, and Fundraising
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

GIA DEGREES, CERTIFICATES, & SPECIAL PROGRAMS

The Master’s in Public and International Affairs (MPIA) draws from across the fields of political science, international relations, geography, history, sociology, and economics to understand the impacts and evolving challenges of globalization on international, national, and local politics.

The program focuses on the governance of political, economic, social, and environmental security and risks at the global level. Courses include:

  • contemporary American foreign policy,
  • conflict resolution,
  • global security,
  • international development,
  • global political economy,
  • global social policy, and
  • environmental politics.

The regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America are analyzed in particular.

The program can be can be taken on a full-time or a part-time basis.  There is also an option for studying abroad for a semester.

Graduates go on to work for the federal, state, and local governments, military and intelligence agencies, a variety of nonprofits and NGOs, as well as private sector consulting and management.

The Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG) draws together insights from the social sciences and humanities in order to study governance processes at all levels of society and international affairs.

The PGG program, managed by Government and International Affairs, offers a unique environment in which faculty and students work closely together to build a research-based program in which students use an interdisciplinary framework to leverage their professional experiences when exploring scholarly puzzles.

Possible research areas include:

  • US foreign policy,
  • new global security threats,
  • conflict resolution,
  • studies in critical geopolitics,
  • global social policy,
  • global political economy,
  • international development challenges and institutions,
  • social movements and
  • political systems.

Faculty expertise covers the regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America.

Many of our PGG students are professionals working in the Washington D.C area working in research positions and a range of nonprofit/NGO, public and private organizations at national and international levels.

The certificate focuses on the politics, society, and history of the peoples of North Africa, Southwestern Asia, Asia Minor, and the Arabian Peninsula, related borderlands and island groups, and including emigrant and immigrant groups.

It addresses the causes and consequences of conflict in the region, the impact of external interventions, including colonialism, and the drivers of political and social change.

Requirements
Total Number of Credit Hours: 9 credit hours.
Transfer credits are not permitted.

Students will choose three courses:

GIA 5314 Middle East Geopolitics (3 credits)

GIA/PSCI 5614 (HIST 5544) Understanding the Israeli Palestinian Conflict (3 credits)

ASPT 5134 Islamic Political Thought (3 credits)

ASPT/HIST/RLCL 6124 (PSCI 6234) Pre-Modern Christian and Islamic Political Theory (3 credits)

Another 5000-level or 6000-level course subject to approval by the certificate candidate’s advisor

Applications for the Graduate Certificate in Security Studies will be considered from students enrolled in a graduate degree program at Virginia Tech and from non-degree and Commonwealth Campus students who have been permitted to take courses by the Graduate School. Certificates will be awarded upon completion of twelve credits (4 courses) and application for the certificate and application for certificate conferral once course requirements have been completed.

Course Requirements

Completion of a total of twelve credit hours; 6 credits in required courses and 6 elective hours. Students must receive a grade of B or better in each course.
(Note: Students will not be allowed to retake a course for a better grade if they receive below a B.)

Required courses:
PSCI/GIA 5444 – International Politics
PSCI/GIA5484 – Contemporary American Foreign Policy

In addition, students must complete at least 6 credit hours from the following:

PSCI 5324 – Executive Branch
PSCI 5464 – Critical Security Studies
PSCI/GIA 5474 – Global Governance
PSCI/GIA5514 – Global Security
PSCI/GIA 5524 – U.S. Foreign Policy after 9/11
PSCI/GIA 5534 – Regionalism and Political Developments

The Certificate represents the socio-economic track in Government and International Affairs program in the Northern Capital Regions (Alexandria). It features courses that cover: global social policy, inequality international development, global political economy, and transnational social movements.

While GIA offers a variety of courses in global politics that relate to human and national security in a realm of threat or conflict, the new certificate broadens these understandings, conceiving security also as a: global social policy concept/commitment, economic goal, and financial representation.

Requirements
Total Number of Credit Hours: 12 credit hours. All courses graded A-F and 5000 or higher. Transfer credits are not permitted.

Four courses must be selected from the courses listed below:

GIA/PAPA 5034 Global Political Economy (formerly, Democratic Governance of the Economy) (3 credits)

GIA/UAP 5274 Comparative Social Movements (3 credits)

GIA 5434 Politics of Developing Areas (3 credits)

GIA/UAP 5524 International Development (3 credits)

GIA 5654 Global Social Policy (3 credits)

GIA 5474 Global Governance (3 credits)

Washington, D.C. is at the center of global affairs. It is home to government agencies, many of the world’s leading think-tanks, numerous international organizations and a range of non-governmental organizations. Here, the most significant policy decisions are debated and made, holding both domestic and international importance.
The Washington Semester in Global Engagement is a unique 15 credit program open to all Virginia Tech majors. The Washington Semester consists of a combination of courses on global affairs, internships opportunities, workshops, seminars and networking opportunities with DC professionals and policy makers. It offers students the opportunity to experience policy-making firsthand, and explore the wealth of political and cultural opportunities available in Washington D.C area.
Stay on track for graduation whilst obtaining skills which will help your career opportunities in virtually any sphere.
– Open for sophomores (by year not credit), Juniors and Seniors in all majors
– Minimum 3.00 GPA.
– Housing is available in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia

Students in the MPIA program can spend a semester studying in:

This semester abroad can count up for four courses towards the completion of the degree. In exceptional circumstances and with permission, students may spend a year overseas and take five courses. Students need to have completed 9 credits and have their plan of study abroad approved prior to going abroad.

For further details: giastudyabroad@vt.edu

Virginia Tech and University of Kent, Brussels have partnered in creating a unique, time efficient graduate program for students to study international relations in a Euro-Atlantic context. Two Capitals, Two Masters is a new and innovative double Master’s program, designed to offer students the opportunity to study, train, and network in two major centers of political activity, Washington D.C. and Brussels. It allows students to earn two graduate degrees – an appealing feature in the job market – in half the time, and for half the cost of a typical graduate degree in the United States, making it a cost and time-effective alternative to existing graduate programs in international affairs.

The program consists of the following:

  1. One year of study at Virginia Tech, National Capital Region (VT-NCR): Students enroll in the Master’s in Public and International Affairs (MPIA).
  2. One year of study at the University of Kent, Brussels (UKB): Students select an MA from the following specializations: international relations, international conflict and security, international political economy, European public policy, or international development.
  3. At the end of two years, students earn an MA from UKB, and an MPIA from VT.

For further details: Dr. Georgeta Pourchot, Director, Two Capitals, Two Masters Program: georgeta@vt.edu

GIA FACULTY & STAFF

Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG)

The doctoral program in Planning, Governance & Globalization is a spin-off from the Environmental Design and Planning (EDP) Ph.D. Program in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies. Initiated in 1975, the EDP program has grown not only in enrollment but also in specializations or streams as the College has become more diverse through restructuring. Effective spring 2007, EDP spun off two separate Ph.D. degrees, Planning, Governance & Globalization (PGG) in the School of Public & International Affairs and Architecture Design Research (ADR) in the School of Architecture + Design.

PGG HAS TWO TRACKS WITHIN THE DEGREE

The GG track is supported by faculty in Government and International Affairs

Thematic Areas in the Governance & Globalization track

  • Governance, Institutions & Civil Society
  • Globalization, Identities, Security, & Economies

The UEDP track is supported by faculty in Urban Affairs and Planning

Thematic Areas in the Urban & Environmental Design & Planning track

  • Metropolitan Development
  • Community & Economic Development Planning
  • International Development Planning
  • Environmental Planning & Sustainability
  • Landscape Planning & Analysis
  • Transportation Planning
  • Physical Planning & Urban Design

The Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG) draws together insights from the social sciences and humanities in order to study governance processes at all levels of society and international affairs.

The PGG program, managed by Government and International Affairs, offers a unique environment in which faculty and students work closely together to build a research-based program in which students use an interdisciplinary framework to leverage their professional experiences when exploring scholarly puzzles.

Possible research areas include:

  • US foreign policy,
  • new global security threats,
  • conflict resolution,
  • studies in critical geopolitics,
  • global social policy,
  • global political economy,
  • international development challenges and institutions,
  • social movements and
  • political systems.

Faculty expertise covers the regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America.

Many of our PGG students are professionals working in the Washington D.C area working in research positions and a range of nonprofit/NGO, public and private organizations at national and international levels.

The PGG program consists on 90 credit hours. This consists of a mixture of coursework (up to 30 hours) and research and dissertation hours. Student can transfer in up to 30 hours from their Master’s degree.
Program is offered in Blacksburg and the Washington D.C (National Capital Region) campuses
Program is open to full and part-time students
Flexible scheduling through online and evening courses
Individualized guidance from faculty advisers
Scholarships and tuition support
Prior graduate credits can be counted towards the degree
Rolling admissions
Classes are offered in the evenings and online to accommodate working professionals and PGG students may enroll part-time. Nearly all courses are taught by regular, full-time faculty.

A limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available each year. Students interested in receiving an assistantship need to apply to the PGG program by 15 February.

Who Should Consider This Degree?

– Professionals and active military in the DC metro area aiming at pursuing a PhD degree while working full time

– Full-time students wishing to work towards their PhD degree, while networking in the Washington policy environment.

– students interested in pursuing an academic career.

CURRENT AND PAST RESEARCH TOPICS

Possible research areas include the US foreign policy, new security threats, conflict resolution, geopolitics, social policy, international finance, economics, and development, the environment and natural resources, and social movements.

The faculty has particular strengths in post-Soviet Eurasia, the Balkans, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Dissertation topics – In progress  

  • Eric Reading – the dynamics shaping global development assistance.
  • Dallas Shaw – military and civilian interventions in “weak”, “failing” and “failed states”.
  • Gabriel Mitchell – the relationship between energy policy and foreign policy in Israel and the Eastern Mediterranean.
  • Craig M. Johnson – international organizations and nuclear security.
  • Gregory Kruczek – nationalism, conflict and Middle Eastern Christian communities
  • Martin Cho – International policy and new energy technology.
  • Carl Ciovacco – Perceptions of threat and US-China relations.
  • Jeanette Ruiz – Informal networks and communication technologies.
  • Pishtiwan Jawal – political Islam, democracy and the Kurdish issue.
  • Gela Merabishvili – Sub-national actors’ influence in international politics.
  • Joe Karle – US nation building efforts in the Middle East since 9/1.
  • Kevin Rosier – international political economy and development.
  • Ashleigh Breske – The governance of repatriation-returning history in a globalized world
  • Putu Desy Apriliani – The effects of microfinance on gender relations in Bali’
  • Jake Keyel – Social and political pressures on, and self-perceptions of, Iraqi refugees in the United States
  • Brett R. Netto – the English School of International Relations Theory and Russian perception of International Society.

Recently Defended Ph.D dissertations:

  • Adis Maksic, 2014, NCR – “Mobilizing for Ethnic Violence? Ethno-National Political Parties and the Dynamics of Ethno Politicization”.
  • David Belt, 2014, NCR – “A Muslim-led Strategy for Countering Violent Extremism”.
  • Michelline Stokes, 2015, Blacksbug – “The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and New River Valley, VA”.
  • Arnold Dupuy, 2016, NCR – “Changing Patterns of Regionalism and Security in the Wider Black Sea Area: The Transformative Impact of Energy”.
  • Bryan Riddle, 2016, NCR – “Accounting for Counterinsurgency Doctrines and Solutions to Warfighting Failures in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghnistan”
  • Sonya Finley,  2016, NCR – “Recommending Political Warfare: The Role of Eisenhower’s Committee on International Information Activities in the US’s Approach to the Cold War”.

PGG ADMISSIONS

Admission to PGG program is based on a combination of four criteria:

  • Performance in Master’s program/Academic Transcript
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Statement of purpose/interest in program
  • Professional background and experience

The PGG program does not have an application deadline but has a ‘rolling admissions’ policy. As a general guideline, applications for Fall Admissions (Fall semester starts in late August) should be filed by 15 July, and applications for Spring admissions (spring semester starts in late January) should be filed by 1 January in order to allow time for review.  Applications for Summer admission is 15 April

A limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available each year.  Students wishing to be considered for one of these assistantships should apply by 15 February.

Students can be admitted to the PGG degree program in the Fall, Spring, and Summer. However, it is recommended that students enter in the Fall or Spring semesters as our foundational courses are taught face to face during the Fall and Spring semesters

What to Prepare

  1. Prospective student need to prepare a statement of interest, detailing their proposed area of research, their professional background and experience (if applicable) and their interest in pursuing a doctorate at Virginia Tech.  They should include a professional resume.
  2. Academic Transcripts – Master’s and undergraduate
  3. Three letters of recommendation from a mix of former professors and others who have had the opportunity to observe the applicant in an academic and  professional capacity.
  4. GRE scores of at least 1100, verbal and quantitative.  Non-traditional, part-time working professionals can make a case for the GRE to be waived. Applicants wishing to request a waver are encouraged to come to an information session or contact the program director, Prof. Joel Peters to be considered.

Test Drive this Degree

Are you uncertain about enrolling in this program but would be interested in trying a class?

Many of our doctoral students, especially part-time students who are working professionals in the Washington D.C area, start the PGG program as a non-degree Commonwealth Campus student.

Commonwealth Campus status is open to an applicant who holds an earned bachelors or higher degree from a regionally accredited U.S. university. Examples of students who seek admission into the Commonwealth Campus program include those who may qualify for regular admission but do not currently wish apply immediately for a graduate degree or need to update their academic credentials after several years of professional experience.

If students perform well in the courses they take, they can build a case for admission into the PGG degree. Students can take up to twelve credit hours (typically four classes) as a non-degree Commonwealth Campus student.

Get info on our non-degree programs

International Students

Please note that International students must have a decision on their applications no later than the following deadlines:

For Fall Admissions – 1 April

For applications for Spring admissions – 1 September.

Please allow plenty of time for the review of your application.  Any decisions made after these time frames need to be approved in advance and on a case-by-case basis, by the Graduate School’s International Graduate Student Services staff.  The contact email is intlncr@vt.edu.

Evidence of English Proficiency: International applicants are exempt from demonstrating English proficiency if they have graduated from an accredited university where English is the language of instruction or if they are U.S. permanent residents (“green card” holders).

International applicants may demonstrate English proficiency by submitting scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). A minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based test (PBT) or 80 on the internet-based test (iBT) is required for consideration of the application.

International students in F-1 or J-1 status who obtained admission into a degree program are eligible for consideration by the academic departments for assistantships and in-state tuition scholarships.

CURRENT PGG-GG STUDENTS

Putu Desy Apriliani putuda8@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Nada Berrada nada1@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisors: Professor Max Stephenson and Dr. Patricia Nickel

Carmen Boggs-Parker cabooker@vt.edu
Intercultural Learning in Cross-cultural Contexts
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Ashleigh Breske aslilly@vt.edu
Governance of Repatriation, Cultural Property in Politically Unstable Regions
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Luis Camacho lcamacho@vt.edu
Economic Development, Sociology of Work, Innovation and Technology in Workplaces, Participatory Management Practices, Dignity at Work
Primary Advisor: Dr. Joyce Rothschild

Martin Cho martinhc@vt.edu
Geopolitics and Development of Energy Resources
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Carl Ciovacco carl7@vt.edu
International Relations and Global Security
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Ben Coleman bencoleman@vt.edu
International Political Economy, Macroeconomics, Finance, Central Banking, Economic History
Primary Advisor:  Dr. Giselle Datz

Lindy Cranwell lindycra@vt.edu
International Education, Higher Education, Faculty Engagement in Comprehensive Internationalization, University Student Global Mobility
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Jonathan Elliott jtelliott@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Simone Franzi franzisimone@vt.edu
Global Political Economy, The Politics and Geography of Trade Agreements
Primary Advisor: Dr. David Bieri

Rachel Gabriele rachelvg@vt.edu
Collaborative Governance in Revitalizing Cities
Primary Advisors: Professor Max Stephenson and Dr. Maggie Cowell

Jen Gooding jgooding@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Ben Grove ben.grove@vt.edu
Leadership of NGOs
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Terken Gupur terken@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Helen Horton helenuva@yahoo.com
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Jim Bohland

Pishtiwan Jalal pishti1@vt.edu
Terrorism, Islamic Radicalism, Political Islam, Democracy and the Kurdish Issue
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Marc Jasper marcwj62@vt.edu
Nationalism; US Military Intervention; Balkans, Caucasus & Middle East Conflict & Area Studies: Peace Operations & Low-intensity Conflict; Conflict Resolution
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Craig Johnson cjohn5x@vt.edu
Post-Cold War Nuclear Security Regimes
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Adna Karamehic akara@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Joseph Karle karle1jb@vt.edu
Analyzing US nation building efforts in the Middle East since 9/11, particularly the way interactions between US personnel and local leaders (governmental and military) impact the development of governance and security structures
Primary Advisor:  Professor Joel Peters

Jared “Jake” Keyel jaredk1@vt.edu
Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, Critical Theory
Primary Advisors: Dr. Patricia Nickel and Professor Tim Luke

Maksym Kolos mkolos@ukr.net
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Gregory Kruczek kruczek1@vt.edu
Lebanon/Syia; Lebanese Civil War; Nationalism studies, Modern Levantine History
Primary Advisors: Dr. Ariel Ahram and Professor Joel Peters

Walter “Rick” Landgraf wfland3@vt.edu
DeFacto States; Ethnic Conflicts; Russian Foreign Policy; NATO-Russia Relations; Visual Geopolitics
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Benjamin Louis bflouis@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professors Joyce Rothschild and Edward Weisband

Sarah Lyon-Hill sarahlh@vt.edu
Theater Arts and Community Economic Development
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Julian R. Meade julian67@vt.edu
Geopolitics of the Arctic Region
Primary Advisor:  Professor Joel Peters

Tiernan Mennen tiernkm@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Giselle Datz

Gela Merabishvili gm88@vt.edu
How sub-state actors, such as cities and regions, influence international politics; the EU, particularly its foreign and security policy, Russia, and the countries in their shared neighborhood
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Allison D. Miller ahern09@vt.edu
Community Cohesion and Countering Violent Extremism: An Ethnographic Analysis of Selected Global Communities
Primary Advisors:  Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Priya Dixit

Gabriel Mitchell gabim14@vt.edu
Regionalism, majority-minority politics, and the formation of state foreign policy. His dissertation explores the relationship between energy policy and foreign policy in Israel and the Eastern Mediterranean
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Brett R. Netto brettn76@vt.edu
Dissertation Title: Russia as a Great Power: An English School Approach to Yeltsin’s Presidency (1991-200)
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Sulayman Njie sauln@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Eric Reading ereading@vt.edu
Political Transitions, International Development, Middle East
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Alana Romanella aromanel@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Kevin Rosier kjrosier@vt.edu
International political economy, macroeconomics, and international development
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

Jeanette Ruiz ruizjr@vt.edu
Understanding How Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) Impact and Empower Informal Networks as these Networks Develop Tools for Re-shaping Economies, Polities, and International Relations
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

Kevin Saderup kevin57@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Hamza Safouane hsafouan@vt.edu
Migration and Migratory Journey Narratives, Apparatus of Capture of Mobility in the EU and Tactics of Escape
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Dallas Shaw dallas69@vt.edu
U.S. Military Interventions in Counterinsurgencies: Military Governance Versus Military Assistance to Governance
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Ethan Tabor etabor6@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

John Terpinas terp@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Donald Tighe donaldvt@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Lacy Watson elw3@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Michael Wiener mtwiener@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Khodr Zaarour kaazrour@vt.edu
Intl Relations, US Foreign & Security Policy, emphasis: transnational crime & contentious politics in the Greater Middle East
Primary Advisors: Professor Karen Hult and Professor Joyce Rothschild

Xiaochen Zhang zxc@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

PGG-GG ALUMNI

Maurice Binioube Aleyao aleyb06@vt.edu
An Investigation of NGO-Government Partnerships for Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS and Malaria in the Maritime Region of Togo
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Don Back dback@vt.edu
Neoliberalism, Academic Capitalism and Higher Education in Developing Countries
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Beth Beck bethbeck@vt.edu
“The Spark that Ignites the Creative Idea: An Examination of the Group Practice of LAUNCH
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Emily Barry-Murphy emilybar@vt.edu
Democratizing the Refugee Regime Complex
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

David Belt beltdavid@gmail.com
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Arnold C. Dupuy acdupuy@vt.edu
Patterns of Regionalism and Security: Energy as a Transformational Influence in the Black Sea Area.
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Heba F. El-Shazli heba@vt.edu
Political Role of Labor Movements in the MENA Region Contributing to the Arab Spring
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Anna Erwin erwinae@vt.edu
Food Systems, Participatory Democracy, Social Justice
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Sonya Finley sonyalf@vt.edu
U.S. Foreign Policy, Public Diplomacy/Psychological Warfare, Defense Strategy
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Stefanie Georgakis Abbott stefieg@vt.edu
Critical International Relations Theory, European Union Politics, Border Studies, Immigration
Primary Advisors: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Eric Hodges ebhodges@usf.edu
Democratic Theory, Civic Engagement, Military Veterans, Moral Philosophy, and Cosmopolitanism
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Emily Howard Ray Emily.Ray@sonoma.edu
Environmental political theory and environmental politics, with particular interest in land-use conflicts, social movements, and feminist theory
Primary Advisory: Professor Tim Luke

Mahin Khan mahin@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Sabithulla Khan khanpgg@vt.edu
Philanthropy, Civil Society, Muslim Societies in the U.S and Middle East, Inter-faith Work and Civic Engagement
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Adis Maksic adismax@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

William Bryan Riddle briddle@lmi.org
The Essence of Desperation:  Accounting for Counterinsurgency Doctrines as Solutions to Warfighting Failures in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Nicole Sanderlin npsander@vt.edu
Internationalization of Higher Education, Faculty Engagement, and Strategic Planning
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Adriana Seagle aseagle@vt.edu
The English School, Sub-global Regional Int’l Societies, Intelligence Practices w/in Military Alliances, European Security and Foreign Policies
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Michelline Stokes sjmichey@vt.edu
Deindustrialization and Household Survival Strategies, Globalization, and Women and Work
Primary Advisor: Drs. Giselle Datz and Dale Wimberley

Sarah Surak smsurak@salisbury.edu
Dissertation: Bringing in the Garbage: Opening a critical space for vehicle disposal practices
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Courtney Thomas courts.thomas@gmail.com
Political Economy, Food Politics, and Mass Political Violence
Primary Advisor: Professor Edward Weisband

Mark Thorum thorun1@cs.com
Dissertation: Essays in International Financial Governance
Primary Advisor: Professors Tim Luke and Charles Taylor

Bart Yavorosky bartyav@vt.edu
Interest Group Politics, Administrative Rulemaking, Public Policy, Nonprofit Leadership, Volunteer Management, and Fundraising
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

GIA DEGREES, CERTIFICATES, & SPECIAL PROGRAMS

The Master’s in Public and International Affairs (MPIA) draws from across the fields of political science, international relations, geography, history, sociology, and economics to understand the impacts and evolving challenges of globalization on international, national, and local politics.

The program focuses on the governance of political, economic, social, and environmental security and risks at the global level. Courses include:

  • contemporary American foreign policy,
  • conflict resolution,
  • global security,
  • international development,
  • global political economy,
  • global social policy, and
  • environmental politics.

The regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America are analyzed in particular.

The program can be can be taken on a full-time or a part-time basis.  There is also an option for studying abroad for a semester.

Graduates go on to work for the federal, state, and local governments, military and intelligence agencies, a variety of nonprofits and NGOs, as well as private sector consulting and management.

The Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG) draws together insights from the social sciences and humanities in order to study governance processes at all levels of society and international affairs.

The PGG program, managed by Government and International Affairs, offers a unique environment in which faculty and students work closely together to build a research-based program in which students use an interdisciplinary framework to leverage their professional experiences when exploring scholarly puzzles.

Possible research areas include:

  • US foreign policy,
  • new global security threats,
  • conflict resolution,
  • studies in critical geopolitics,
  • global social policy,
  • global political economy,
  • international development challenges and institutions,
  • social movements and
  • political systems.

Faculty expertise covers the regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America.

Many of our PGG students are professionals working in the Washington D.C area working in research positions and a range of nonprofit/NGO, public and private organizations at national and international levels.

The certificate focuses on the politics, society, and history of the peoples of North Africa, Southwestern Asia, Asia Minor, and the Arabian Peninsula, related borderlands and island groups, and including emigrant and immigrant groups.

It addresses the causes and consequences of conflict in the region, the impact of external interventions, including colonialism, and the drivers of political and social change.

Requirements
Total Number of Credit Hours: 9 credit hours.
Transfer credits are not permitted.

Students will choose three courses:

GIA 5314 Middle East Geopolitics (3 credits)

GIA/PSCI 5614 (HIST 5544) Understanding the Israeli Palestinian Conflict (3 credits)

ASPT 5134 Islamic Political Thought (3 credits)

ASPT/HIST/RLCL 6124 (PSCI 6234) Pre-Modern Christian and Islamic Political Theory (3 credits)

Another 5000-level or 6000-level course subject to approval by the certificate candidate’s advisor

Applications for the Graduate Certificate in Security Studies will be considered from students enrolled in a graduate degree program at Virginia Tech and from non-degree and Commonwealth Campus students who have been permitted to take courses by the Graduate School. Certificates will be awarded upon completion of twelve credits (4 courses) and application for the certificate and application for certificate conferral once course requirements have been completed.

Course Requirements

Completion of a total of twelve credit hours; 6 credits in required courses and 6 elective hours. Students must receive a grade of B or better in each course.
(Note: Students will not be allowed to retake a course for a better grade if they receive below a B.)

Required courses:
PSCI/GIA 5444 – International Politics
PSCI/GIA5484 – Contemporary American Foreign Policy

In addition, students must complete at least 6 credit hours from the following:

PSCI 5324 – Executive Branch
PSCI 5464 – Critical Security Studies
PSCI/GIA 5474 – Global Governance
PSCI/GIA5514 – Global Security
PSCI/GIA 5524 – U.S. Foreign Policy after 9/11
PSCI/GIA 5534 – Regionalism and Political Developments

The Certificate represents the socio-economic track in Government and International Affairs program in the Northern Capital Regions (Alexandria). It features courses that cover: global social policy, inequality international development, global political economy, and transnational social movements.

While GIA offers a variety of courses in global politics that relate to human and national security in a realm of threat or conflict, the new certificate broadens these understandings, conceiving security also as a: global social policy concept/commitment, economic goal, and financial representation.

Requirements
Total Number of Credit Hours: 12 credit hours. All courses graded A-F and 5000 or higher. Transfer credits are not permitted.

Four courses must be selected from the courses listed below:

GIA/PAPA 5034 Global Political Economy (formerly, Democratic Governance of the Economy) (3 credits)

GIA/UAP 5274 Comparative Social Movements (3 credits)

GIA 5434 Politics of Developing Areas (3 credits)

GIA/UAP 5524 International Development (3 credits)

GIA 5654 Global Social Policy (3 credits)

GIA 5474 Global Governance (3 credits)

Washington, D.C. is at the center of global affairs. It is home to government agencies, many of the world’s leading think-tanks, numerous international organizations and a range of non-governmental organizations. Here, the most significant policy decisions are debated and made, holding both domestic and international importance.
The Washington Semester in Global Engagement is a unique 15 credit program open to all Virginia Tech majors. The Washington Semester consists of a combination of courses on global affairs, internships opportunities, workshops, seminars and networking opportunities with DC professionals and policy makers. It offers students the opportunity to experience policy-making firsthand, and explore the wealth of political and cultural opportunities available in Washington D.C area.
Stay on track for graduation whilst obtaining skills which will help your career opportunities in virtually any sphere.
– Open for sophomores (by year not credit), Juniors and Seniors in all majors
– Minimum 3.00 GPA.
– Housing is available in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia

Students in the MPIA program can spend a semester studying in:

This semester abroad can count up for four courses towards the completion of the degree. In exceptional circumstances and with permission, students may spend a year overseas and take five courses. Students need to have completed 9 credits and have their plan of study abroad approved prior to going abroad.

For further details: giastudyabroad@vt.edu

Virginia Tech and University of Kent, Brussels have partnered in creating a unique, time efficient graduate program for students to study international relations in a Euro-Atlantic context. Two Capitals, Two Masters is a new and innovative double Master’s program, designed to offer students the opportunity to study, train, and network in two major centers of political activity, Washington D.C. and Brussels. It allows students to earn two graduate degrees – an appealing feature in the job market – in half the time, and for half the cost of a typical graduate degree in the United States, making it a cost and time-effective alternative to existing graduate programs in international affairs.

The program consists of the following:

  1. One year of study at Virginia Tech, National Capital Region (VT-NCR): Students enroll in the Master’s in Public and International Affairs (MPIA).
  2. One year of study at the University of Kent, Brussels (UKB): Students select an MA from the following specializations: international relations, international conflict and security, international political economy, European public policy, or international development.
  3. At the end of two years, students earn an MA from UKB, and an MPIA from VT.

For further details: Dr. Georgeta Pourchot, Director, Two Capitals, Two Masters Program: georgeta@vt.edu

GIA FACULTY & STAFF

Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG)

The doctoral program in Planning, Governance & Globalization is a spin-off from the Environmental Design and Planning (EDP) Ph.D. Program in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies. Initiated in 1975, the EDP program has grown not only in enrollment but also in specializations or streams as the College has become more diverse through restructuring. Effective spring 2007, EDP spun off two separate Ph.D. degrees, Planning, Governance & Globalization (PGG) in the School of Public & International Affairs and Architecture Design Research (ADR) in the School of Architecture + Design.

PGG HAS TWO TRACKS WITHIN THE DEGREE

The GG track is supported by faculty in Government and International Affairs

Thematic Areas in the Governance & Globalization track

  • Governance, Institutions & Civil Society
  • Globalization, Identities, Security, & Economies

The UEDP track is supported by faculty in Urban Affairs and Planning

Thematic Areas in the Urban & Environmental Design & Planning track

  • Metropolitan Development
  • Community & Economic Development Planning
  • International Development Planning
  • Environmental Planning & Sustainability
  • Landscape Planning & Analysis
  • Transportation Planning
  • Physical Planning & Urban Design

The Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG) draws together insights from the social sciences and humanities in order to study governance processes at all levels of society and international affairs.

The PGG program, managed by Government and International Affairs, offers a unique environment in which faculty and students work closely together to build a research-based program in which students use an interdisciplinary framework to leverage their professional experiences when exploring scholarly puzzles.

Possible research areas include:

  • US foreign policy,
  • new global security threats,
  • conflict resolution,
  • studies in critical geopolitics,
  • global social policy,
  • global political economy,
  • international development challenges and institutions,
  • social movements and
  • political systems.

Faculty expertise covers the regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America.

Many of our PGG students are professionals working in the Washington D.C area working in research positions and a range of nonprofit/NGO, public and private organizations at national and international levels.

The PGG program consists on 90 credit hours. This consists of a mixture of coursework (up to 30 hours) and research and dissertation hours. Student can transfer in up to 30 hours from their Master’s degree.
Program is offered in Blacksburg and the Washington D.C (National Capital Region) campuses
Program is open to full and part-time students
Flexible scheduling through online and evening courses
Individualized guidance from faculty advisers
Scholarships and tuition support
Prior graduate credits can be counted towards the degree
Rolling admissions
Classes are offered in the evenings and online to accommodate working professionals and PGG students may enroll part-time. Nearly all courses are taught by regular, full-time faculty.

A limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available each year. Students interested in receiving an assistantship need to apply to the PGG program by 15 February.

Who Should Consider This Degree?

– Professionals and active military in the DC metro area aiming at pursuing a PhD degree while working full time

– Full-time students wishing to work towards their PhD degree, while networking in the Washington policy environment.

– students interested in pursuing an academic career.

CURRENT AND PAST RESEARCH TOPICS

Possible research areas include the US foreign policy, new security threats, conflict resolution, geopolitics, social policy, international finance, economics, and development, the environment and natural resources, and social movements.

The faculty has particular strengths in post-Soviet Eurasia, the Balkans, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Dissertation topics – In progress  

  • Eric Reading – the dynamics shaping global development assistance.
  • Dallas Shaw – military and civilian interventions in “weak”, “failing” and “failed states”.
  • Gabriel Mitchell – the relationship between energy policy and foreign policy in Israel and the Eastern Mediterranean.
  • Craig M. Johnson – international organizations and nuclear security.
  • Gregory Kruczek – nationalism, conflict and Middle Eastern Christian communities
  • Martin Cho – International policy and new energy technology.
  • Carl Ciovacco – Perceptions of threat and US-China relations.
  • Jeanette Ruiz – Informal networks and communication technologies.
  • Pishtiwan Jawal – political Islam, democracy and the Kurdish issue.
  • Gela Merabishvili – Sub-national actors’ influence in international politics.
  • Joe Karle – US nation building efforts in the Middle East since 9/1.
  • Kevin Rosier – international political economy and development.
  • Ashleigh Breske – The governance of repatriation-returning history in a globalized world
  • Putu Desy Apriliani – The effects of microfinance on gender relations in Bali’
  • Jake Keyel – Social and political pressures on, and self-perceptions of, Iraqi refugees in the United States
  • Brett R. Netto – the English School of International Relations Theory and Russian perception of International Society.

Recently Defended Ph.D dissertations:

  • Adis Maksic, 2014, NCR – “Mobilizing for Ethnic Violence? Ethno-National Political Parties and the Dynamics of Ethno Politicization”.
  • David Belt, 2014, NCR – “A Muslim-led Strategy for Countering Violent Extremism”.
  • Michelline Stokes, 2015, Blacksbug – “The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and New River Valley, VA”.
  • Arnold Dupuy, 2016, NCR – “Changing Patterns of Regionalism and Security in the Wider Black Sea Area: The Transformative Impact of Energy”.
  • Bryan Riddle, 2016, NCR – “Accounting for Counterinsurgency Doctrines and Solutions to Warfighting Failures in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghnistan”
  • Sonya Finley,  2016, NCR – “Recommending Political Warfare: The Role of Eisenhower’s Committee on International Information Activities in the US’s Approach to the Cold War”.

PGG ADMISSIONS

Admission to PGG program is based on a combination of four criteria:

  • Performance in Master’s program/Academic Transcript
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Statement of purpose/interest in program
  • Professional background and experience

The PGG program does not have an application deadline but has a ‘rolling admissions’ policy. As a general guideline, applications for Fall Admissions (Fall semester starts in late August) should be filed by 15 July, and applications for Spring admissions (spring semester starts in late January) should be filed by 1 January in order to allow time for review.  Applications for Summer admission is 15 April

A limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available each year.  Students wishing to be considered for one of these assistantships should apply by 15 February.

Students can be admitted to the PGG degree program in the Fall, Spring, and Summer. However, it is recommended that students enter in the Fall or Spring semesters as our foundational courses are taught face to face during the Fall and Spring semesters

What to Prepare

  1. Prospective student need to prepare a statement of interest, detailing their proposed area of research, their professional background and experience (if applicable) and their interest in pursuing a doctorate at Virginia Tech.  They should include a professional resume.
  2. Academic Transcripts – Master’s and undergraduate
  3. Three letters of recommendation from a mix of former professors and others who have had the opportunity to observe the applicant in an academic and  professional capacity.
  4. GRE scores of at least 1100, verbal and quantitative.  Non-traditional, part-time working professionals can make a case for the GRE to be waived. Applicants wishing to request a waver are encouraged to come to an information session or contact the program director, Prof. Joel Peters to be considered.

Test Drive this Degree

Are you uncertain about enrolling in this program but would be interested in trying a class?

Many of our doctoral students, especially part-time students who are working professionals in the Washington D.C area, start the PGG program as a non-degree Commonwealth Campus student.

Commonwealth Campus status is open to an applicant who holds an earned bachelors or higher degree from a regionally accredited U.S. university. Examples of students who seek admission into the Commonwealth Campus program include those who may qualify for regular admission but do not currently wish apply immediately for a graduate degree or need to update their academic credentials after several years of professional experience.

If students perform well in the courses they take, they can build a case for admission into the PGG degree. Students can take up to twelve credit hours (typically four classes) as a non-degree Commonwealth Campus student.

Get info on our non-degree programs

International Students

Please note that International students must have a decision on their applications no later than the following deadlines:

For Fall Admissions – 1 April

For applications for Spring admissions – 1 September.

Please allow plenty of time for the review of your application.  Any decisions made after these time frames need to be approved in advance and on a case-by-case basis, by the Graduate School’s International Graduate Student Services staff.  The contact email is intlncr@vt.edu.

Evidence of English Proficiency: International applicants are exempt from demonstrating English proficiency if they have graduated from an accredited university where English is the language of instruction or if they are U.S. permanent residents (“green card” holders).

International applicants may demonstrate English proficiency by submitting scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). A minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based test (PBT) or 80 on the internet-based test (iBT) is required for consideration of the application.

International students in F-1 or J-1 status who obtained admission into a degree program are eligible for consideration by the academic departments for assistantships and in-state tuition scholarships.

CURRENT PGG-GG STUDENTS

Putu Desy Apriliani putuda8@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Nada Berrada nada1@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisors: Professor Max Stephenson and Dr. Patricia Nickel

Carmen Boggs-Parker cabooker@vt.edu
Intercultural Learning in Cross-cultural Contexts
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Ashleigh Breske aslilly@vt.edu
Governance of Repatriation, Cultural Property in Politically Unstable Regions
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Luis Camacho lcamacho@vt.edu
Economic Development, Sociology of Work, Innovation and Technology in Workplaces, Participatory Management Practices, Dignity at Work
Primary Advisor: Dr. Joyce Rothschild

Martin Cho martinhc@vt.edu
Geopolitics and Development of Energy Resources
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Carl Ciovacco carl7@vt.edu
International Relations and Global Security
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Ben Coleman bencoleman@vt.edu
International Political Economy, Macroeconomics, Finance, Central Banking, Economic History
Primary Advisor:  Dr. Giselle Datz

Lindy Cranwell lindycra@vt.edu
International Education, Higher Education, Faculty Engagement in Comprehensive Internationalization, University Student Global Mobility
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Jonathan Elliott jtelliott@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Simone Franzi franzisimone@vt.edu
Global Political Economy, The Politics and Geography of Trade Agreements
Primary Advisor: Dr. David Bieri

Rachel Gabriele rachelvg@vt.edu
Collaborative Governance in Revitalizing Cities
Primary Advisors: Professor Max Stephenson and Dr. Maggie Cowell

Jen Gooding jgooding@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Ben Grove ben.grove@vt.edu
Leadership of NGOs
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Terken Gupur terken@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Helen Horton helenuva@yahoo.com
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Jim Bohland

Pishtiwan Jalal pishti1@vt.edu
Terrorism, Islamic Radicalism, Political Islam, Democracy and the Kurdish Issue
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Marc Jasper marcwj62@vt.edu
Nationalism; US Military Intervention; Balkans, Caucasus & Middle East Conflict & Area Studies: Peace Operations & Low-intensity Conflict; Conflict Resolution
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Craig Johnson cjohn5x@vt.edu
Post-Cold War Nuclear Security Regimes
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Adna Karamehic akara@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Joseph Karle karle1jb@vt.edu
Analyzing US nation building efforts in the Middle East since 9/11, particularly the way interactions between US personnel and local leaders (governmental and military) impact the development of governance and security structures
Primary Advisor:  Professor Joel Peters

Jared “Jake” Keyel jaredk1@vt.edu
Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, Critical Theory
Primary Advisors: Dr. Patricia Nickel and Professor Tim Luke

Maksym Kolos mkolos@ukr.net
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Gregory Kruczek kruczek1@vt.edu
Lebanon/Syia; Lebanese Civil War; Nationalism studies, Modern Levantine History
Primary Advisors: Dr. Ariel Ahram and Professor Joel Peters

Walter “Rick” Landgraf wfland3@vt.edu
DeFacto States; Ethnic Conflicts; Russian Foreign Policy; NATO-Russia Relations; Visual Geopolitics
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Benjamin Louis bflouis@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professors Joyce Rothschild and Edward Weisband

Sarah Lyon-Hill sarahlh@vt.edu
Theater Arts and Community Economic Development
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Julian R. Meade julian67@vt.edu
Geopolitics of the Arctic Region
Primary Advisor:  Professor Joel Peters

Tiernan Mennen tiernkm@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Giselle Datz

Gela Merabishvili gm88@vt.edu
How sub-state actors, such as cities and regions, influence international politics; the EU, particularly its foreign and security policy, Russia, and the countries in their shared neighborhood
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Allison D. Miller ahern09@vt.edu
Community Cohesion and Countering Violent Extremism: An Ethnographic Analysis of Selected Global Communities
Primary Advisors:  Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Priya Dixit

Gabriel Mitchell gabim14@vt.edu
Regionalism, majority-minority politics, and the formation of state foreign policy. His dissertation explores the relationship between energy policy and foreign policy in Israel and the Eastern Mediterranean
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Brett R. Netto brettn76@vt.edu
Dissertation Title: Russia as a Great Power: An English School Approach to Yeltsin’s Presidency (1991-200)
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Sulayman Njie sauln@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Eric Reading ereading@vt.edu
Political Transitions, International Development, Middle East
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Alana Romanella aromanel@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Kevin Rosier kjrosier@vt.edu
International political economy, macroeconomics, and international development
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

Jeanette Ruiz ruizjr@vt.edu
Understanding How Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) Impact and Empower Informal Networks as these Networks Develop Tools for Re-shaping Economies, Polities, and International Relations
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

Kevin Saderup kevin57@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Hamza Safouane hsafouan@vt.edu
Migration and Migratory Journey Narratives, Apparatus of Capture of Mobility in the EU and Tactics of Escape
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Dallas Shaw dallas69@vt.edu
U.S. Military Interventions in Counterinsurgencies: Military Governance Versus Military Assistance to Governance
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ariel Ahram

Ethan Tabor etabor6@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Dr. Giselle Datz

John Terpinas terp@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Donald Tighe donaldvt@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Lacy Watson elw3@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Michael Wiener mtwiener@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Khodr Zaarour kaazrour@vt.edu
Intl Relations, US Foreign & Security Policy, emphasis: transnational crime & contentious politics in the Greater Middle East
Primary Advisors: Professor Karen Hult and Professor Joyce Rothschild

Xiaochen Zhang zxc@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

PGG-GG ALUMNI

Maurice Binioube Aleyao aleyb06@vt.edu
An Investigation of NGO-Government Partnerships for Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS and Malaria in the Maritime Region of Togo
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Don Back dback@vt.edu
Neoliberalism, Academic Capitalism and Higher Education in Developing Countries
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Beth Beck bethbeck@vt.edu
“The Spark that Ignites the Creative Idea: An Examination of the Group Practice of LAUNCH
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Emily Barry-Murphy emilybar@vt.edu
Democratizing the Refugee Regime Complex
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

David Belt beltdavid@gmail.com
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Arnold C. Dupuy acdupuy@vt.edu
Patterns of Regionalism and Security: Energy as a Transformational Influence in the Black Sea Area.
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Heba F. El-Shazli heba@vt.edu
Political Role of Labor Movements in the MENA Region Contributing to the Arab Spring
Primary Advisor: Professor Joel Peters

Anna Erwin erwinae@vt.edu
Food Systems, Participatory Democracy, Social Justice
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Sonya Finley sonyalf@vt.edu
U.S. Foreign Policy, Public Diplomacy/Psychological Warfare, Defense Strategy
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Stefanie Georgakis Abbott stefieg@vt.edu
Critical International Relations Theory, European Union Politics, Border Studies, Immigration
Primary Advisors: Professor Tim Luke and Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Eric Hodges ebhodges@usf.edu
Democratic Theory, Civic Engagement, Military Veterans, Moral Philosophy, and Cosmopolitanism
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Emily Howard Ray Emily.Ray@sonoma.edu
Environmental political theory and environmental politics, with particular interest in land-use conflicts, social movements, and feminist theory
Primary Advisory: Professor Tim Luke

Mahin Khan mahin@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Sabithulla Khan khanpgg@vt.edu
Philanthropy, Civil Society, Muslim Societies in the U.S and Middle East, Inter-faith Work and Civic Engagement
Primary Advisor: Professor Joyce Rothschild

Adis Maksic adismax@vt.edu
Not stated
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

William Bryan Riddle briddle@lmi.org
The Essence of Desperation:  Accounting for Counterinsurgency Doctrines as Solutions to Warfighting Failures in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan
Primary Advisor: Professor Gerard Toal

Nicole Sanderlin npsander@vt.edu
Internationalization of Higher Education, Faculty Engagement, and Strategic Planning
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

Adriana Seagle aseagle@vt.edu
The English School, Sub-global Regional Int’l Societies, Intelligence Practices w/in Military Alliances, European Security and Foreign Policies
Primary Advisor: Dr. Ioannis Stivachtis

Michelline Stokes sjmichey@vt.edu
Deindustrialization and Household Survival Strategies, Globalization, and Women and Work
Primary Advisor: Drs. Giselle Datz and Dale Wimberley

Sarah Surak smsurak@salisbury.edu
Dissertation: Bringing in the Garbage: Opening a critical space for vehicle disposal practices
Primary Advisor: Professor Tim Luke

Courtney Thomas courts.thomas@gmail.com
Political Economy, Food Politics, and Mass Political Violence
Primary Advisor: Professor Edward Weisband

Mark Thorum thorun1@cs.com
Dissertation: Essays in International Financial Governance
Primary Advisor: Professors Tim Luke and Charles Taylor

Bart Yavorosky bartyav@vt.edu
Interest Group Politics, Administrative Rulemaking, Public Policy, Nonprofit Leadership, Volunteer Management, and Fundraising
Primary Advisor: Professor Max Stephenson

GIA DEGREES, CERTIFICATES, & SPECIAL PROGRAMS

The Master’s in Public and International Affairs (MPIA) draws from across the fields of political science, international relations, geography, history, sociology, and economics to understand the impacts and evolving challenges of globalization on international, national, and local politics.

The program focuses on the governance of political, economic, social, and environmental security and risks at the global level. Courses include:

  • contemporary American foreign policy,
  • conflict resolution,
  • global security,
  • international development,
  • global political economy,
  • global social policy, and
  • environmental politics.

The regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America are analyzed in particular.

The program can be can be taken on a full-time or a part-time basis.  There is also an option for studying abroad for a semester.

Graduates go on to work for the federal, state, and local governments, military and intelligence agencies, a variety of nonprofits and NGOs, as well as private sector consulting and management.

The Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, and Globalization (PGG) draws together insights from the social sciences and humanities in order to study governance processes at all levels of society and international affairs.

The PGG program, managed by Government and International Affairs, offers a unique environment in which faculty and students work closely together to build a research-based program in which students use an interdisciplinary framework to leverage their professional experiences when exploring scholarly puzzles.

Possible research areas include:

  • US foreign policy,
  • new global security threats,
  • conflict resolution,
  • studies in critical geopolitics,
  • global social policy,
  • global political economy,
  • international development challenges and institutions,
  • social movements and
  • political systems.

Faculty expertise covers the regional politics of the Middle East, post-Soviet Eurasia, and Latin America.

Many of our PGG students are professionals working in the Washington D.C area working in research positions and a range of nonprofit/NGO, public and private organizations at national and international levels.

The certificate focuses on the politics, society, and history of the peoples of North Africa, Southwestern Asia, Asia Minor, and the Arabian Peninsula, related borderlands and island groups, and including emigrant and immigrant groups.

It addresses the causes and consequences of conflict in the region, the impact of external interventions, including colonialism, and the drivers of political and social change.

Requirements
Total Number of Credit Hours: 9 credit hours.
Transfer credits are not permitted.

Students will choose three courses:

GIA 5314 Middle East Geopolitics (3 credits)

GIA/PSCI 5614 (HIST 5544) Understanding the Israeli Palestinian Conflict (3 credits)

ASPT 5134 Islamic Political Thought (3 credits)

ASPT/HIST/RLCL 6124 (PSCI 6234) Pre-Modern Christian and Islamic Political Theory (3 credits)

Another 5000-level or 6000-level course subject to approval by the certificate candidate’s advisor

Applications for the Graduate Certificate in Security Studies will be considered from students enrolled in a graduate degree program at Virginia Tech and from non-degree and Commonwealth Campus students who have been permitted to take courses by the Graduate School. Certificates will be awarded upon completion of twelve credits (4 courses) and application for the certificate and application for certificate conferral once course requirements have been completed.

Course Requirements

Completion of a total of twelve credit hours; 6 credits in required courses and 6 elective hours. Students must receive a grade of B or better in each course.
(Note: Students will not be allowed to retake a course for a better grade if they receive below a B.)

Required courses:
PSCI/GIA 5444 – International Politics
PSCI/GIA5484 – Contemporary American Foreign Policy

In addition, students must complete at least 6 credit hours from the following:

PSCI 5324 – Executive Branch
PSCI 5464 – Critical Security Studies
PSCI/GIA 5474 – Global Governance
PSCI/GIA5514 – Global Security
PSCI/GIA 5524 – U.S. Foreign Policy after 9/11
PSCI/GIA 5534 – Regionalism and Political Developments

The Certificate represents the socio-economic track in Government and International Affairs program in the Northern Capital Regions (Alexandria). It features courses that cover: global social policy, inequality international development, global political economy, and transnational social movements.

While GIA offers a variety of courses in global politics that relate to human and national security in a realm of threat or conflict, the new certificate broadens these understandings, conceiving security also as a: global social policy concept/commitment, economic goal, and financial representation.

Requirements
Total Number of Credit Hours: 12 credit hours. All courses graded A-F and 5000 or higher. Transfer credits are not permitted.

Four courses must be selected from the courses listed below:

GIA/PAPA 5034 Global Political Economy (formerly, Democratic Governance of the Economy) (3 credits)

GIA/UAP 5274 Comparative Social Movements (3 credits)

GIA 5434 Politics of Developing Areas (3 credits)

GIA/UAP 5524 International Development (3 credits)

GIA 5654 Global Social Policy (3 credits)

GIA 5474 Global Governance (3 credits)

Washington, D.C. is at the center of global affairs. It is home to government agencies, many of the world’s leading think-tanks, numerous international organizations and a range of non-governmental organizations. Here, the most significant policy decisions are debated and made, holding both domestic and international importance.
The Washington Semester in Global Engagement is a unique 15 credit program open to all Virginia Tech majors. The Washington Semester consists of a combination of courses on global affairs, internships opportunities, workshops, seminars and networking opportunities with DC professionals and policy makers. It offers students the opportunity to experience policy-making firsthand, and explore the wealth of political and cultural opportunities available in Washington D.C area.
Stay on track for graduation whilst obtaining skills which will help your career opportunities in virtually any sphere.
– Open for sophomores (by year not credit), Juniors and Seniors in all majors
– Minimum 3.00 GPA.
– Housing is available in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia

Students in the MPIA program can spend a semester studying in:

This semester abroad can count up for four courses towards the completion of the degree. In exceptional circumstances and with permission, students may spend a year overseas and take five courses. Students need to have completed 9 credits and have their plan of study abroad approved prior to going abroad.

For further details: giastudyabroad@vt.edu

Virginia Tech and University of Kent, Brussels have partnered in creating a unique, time efficient graduate program for students to study international relations in a Euro-Atlantic context. Two Capitals, Two Masters is a new and innovative double Master’s program, designed to offer students the opportunity to study, train, and network in two major centers of political activity, Washington D.C. and Brussels. It allows students to earn two graduate degrees – an appealing feature in the job market – in half the time, and for half the cost of a typical graduate degree in the United States, making it a cost and time-effective alternative to existing graduate programs in international affairs.

The program consists of the following:

  1. One year of study at Virginia Tech, National Capital Region (VT-NCR): Students enroll in the Master’s in Public and International Affairs (MPIA).
  2. One year of study at the University of Kent, Brussels (UKB): Students select an MA from the following specializations: international relations, international conflict and security, international political economy, European public policy, or international development.
  3. At the end of two years, students earn an MA from UKB, and an MPIA from VT.

For further details: Dr. Georgeta Pourchot, Director, Two Capitals, Two Masters Program: georgeta@vt.edu

GIA FACULTY & STAFF

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

A REGIONAL COMMUNITY  ADDRESSING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

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WASHINGTON, DC

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BLACKSBURG

WASHINGTON, DC

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WASHINGTON, DC

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